Publication Date

2017

Abstract

[Excerpt] This book examines efforts to expand access to health care and AIDS medicine in Thailand, Brazil, and South Africa. Although these countries are geographi­cally far apart, they share many similarities as newly industrializing countries engaged in processes of democratic opening. Scholars have often suggested that expansionary social policy is the product of left-wing parties and labor unions or bottom-up people’s movements. From a strictly rational perspective, that these groups would be at the forefront of such change makes perfect sense. After all, expanding access to health care and medicine would seem to be in their interest, and they would appear to have a lot to gain.

While this book recognizes the role they often play, it focuses on a different, more puzzling set of actors whose actions are sometimes even more decisive in expanding access to health care and medicine: elites from esteemed professions who, rationally speaking, aren’t in need of health care or medicine themselves and who would otherwise seem to have little to gain from such policies. This group includes doctors like Sanguan Nitayarumphong and Paulo Teixeira, whose work with the poor and needy informed their advocacy for universal health care in Thailand and Brazil while also putting them into conflict with the medical profession of which they were a part. How is it that these people would play such an important and active role in making change happen?

Comments

The abstract, table of contents, and first twenty-five pages are published with permission from the Cornell University Press. For ordering information, please visit the Cornell University Press.

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