Publication Date

2002

Abstract

Unlike much of the gender and welfare literature, this study examines why a regime that constrains pressure from below would adopt gendered social policies. The Salvadoran case (1944-1972) suggests that political instability rather than societal pressures may prompt semi-authoritarian regimes to adopt gendered labor reforms. We extend the motivations for adopting gendered labor reforms to include co-opting labor by examining gendered labor reforms in the context of El Salvador’s historically contingent labor strategy. This gendered analysis helps explain how a semi-authoritarian regime secured political stability and reveals the special appeal gendered labor reforms may have to semi-authoritarian regimes.

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Required Publisher Statement
© Oxford University Press. Reprinted with permission. All rights reserved. Final version published as: Griffith, K. L., & Gates, L. C. (2002). A state’s gendered response to political instability: Gendering labor policy in semi-authoritarian El Salvador (1944-1972). Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State & Society, 9(2), 248-292.

Suggested Citation
Griffith, K. L., & Gates, L. C. (2002). A state’s gendered response to political instability: Gendering labor policy in semi-authoritarian El Salvador (1944-1972) [Electronic version]. Retrieved [insert date], from Cornell University, ILR School site: https://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/articles/1315

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