Publication Date

2007

Abstract

This paper theorizes the role of shared responsibility in the development of affective group attachments, interweaving ideas from social exchange and social identity theories. The main arguments are that (1) people engaged in task interaction experience positive or negative emotions from those interactions; (2) tasks that promote more sense of shared responsibility across members lead people to attribute their individual emotions to groups or organizations; and (3) group attributions of own emotions are the basis for stronger or weaker group attachments. The paper suggests that social categorization and structural interdependence promote group attachments by producing task interactions that have positive emotional effects on those involved.

Comments

Required Publisher Statement
© Emerald. Final version published as: Lawler, E. J. (2007). Affect and group attachments: The role of shared responsibility [Electronic version]. In E. A. Mannix, M. A., Neal, & C. P. Anderson (Eds.), Research on managing groups and teams: Vol. 10, Affect and groups (pp. 185-216). Stamford, CT: JAI Press. Reprinted with permission. All rights reserved.

Suggested Citation
Lawler, E. J. (2007). Affect and group attachments: The role of shared responsibility [Electronic version]. Retrieved [insert date], from Cornell University, ILR School site: https://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/articles/1260

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