Publication Date

5-16-2008

Abstract

It has been known for centuries that the rich and famous have longer lives than the poor and ordinary. Causality, however, remains trenchantly debated. The ideal experiment would be one in which extra status could somehow be dropped upon a sub-sample of individuals while those in a control group of comparable individuals received none. This paper attempts to formulate a test in that spirit. It collects 19th-century birth data on science Nobel Prize winners. Correcting for potential biases, we estimate that winning the Prize, compared to merely being nominated, is associated with between 1 and 2 years of extra longevity.

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Suggested Citation
Rablen, M.D. & Oswald, A.J. (2008). Mortality and immortality: The Nobel Prizes as an experiment into the effect of status upon longevity [Electronic version]. Retrieved [insert date], from Cornell University, School of Industrial and Labor Relations site: http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/workingpapers/136/

Required Publisher Statement
Published by the Cornell Higher Education Research Institute, Cornell University.

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