Publication Date

4-2010

Abstract

{Excerpt} If 80% of knowledge is unwritten and largely unspoken, we first need to elicit that before we can articulate, share, and make wider use of it. Knowledge harvesting is one way to drawout and package tacit knowledge to help others adapt, personalize, and apply it; build organizational capacity; and preserve institutional memory.

The so-called know-do gap is one outcome of poor knowledge translation and organizational forgetting. In decreasing order of incidence, that is commonly attributed to (i) shortage of resources, e.g., skills, time, and finance, (ii) lack of buy in at all levels within and across organizations, and (iii) information overload. Shortage of resources affects policymakers, researchers, and practitioners equally.

In the 21st century, intra-organizational flows of knowledge have become as important as the resource itself. And so, managing both stocks and flows has become an imperative rather than an alternative for most organizations. Knowledge harvesting is a means to draw out, express, and package tacit knowledge to help others adapt, personalize, and apply it; build organizational capacity; and preserve institutional memory. In addition to context and complexity, the concepts that relate to it are tacit knowledge stocks, tacit knowledge flows, and enablers and inhibitors of tacit knowledge work.

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Suggested Citation

Serrat, O. (2010). Harvesting knowledge. Washington, DC: Asian Development Bank.

Required Publisher's Statement

This article was first published by the Asian Development Bank (www.adb.org)

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