Publication Date

10-1-2001

Abstract

Using the ExecuComp data set, which contains information on the five highest-paid executives in each of a large number of U.S. firms for the years 1992–97, the authors examine the gender compensation gap among high-level executives. Women, who represented about 2.5% of the sample, earned about 45% less than men. As much as 75% of this gap can be explained by the fact that women managed smaller companies and were less likely to be CEO, Chair, or company President. The unexplained gap falls to less than 5% with an allowance for the younger average age and lower average seniority of the female executives. These results do not rule out the possibility of discrimination via gender segregation or unequal promotion. Between 1992 and 1997, however, women nearly tripled their participation in the top executive ranks and also strongly improved their relative compensation, mostly by gaining representation in larger corporations.

Comments

Suggested Citation
Bertrand, M., & Hallock, K. (2001). The gender gap in top corporate jobs [Electronic version]. Industrial and Labor Relations Review, 55, 3-21.
http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/hrpubs/14/

Required Publisher Statement
Posted with permission from the Industrial and Labor Relations Review.