Publication Date

2009

Abstract

Extant compensation literature has indicated that pay-for-performance can influence employee performance. There is little research, however, that differentiates the effects of certain forms of pay-for-performance plans on future performance. By applying the precepts of expectancy theory to specific components of the pay-for-performance plans and using longitudinal data from a sample of 739 US employees in a service-related organization, this study demonstrates different effects for merit pay, bonuses, and long-term incentives.

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Required Publisher Statement
© Wiley. Final version published as: Park, S., & Sturman, M. C. (2016). Evaluating form and functionality of pay-for-perfomance plans: The relative incentive and sorting effects of merit pay, bonuses, and long-term incentives. Human Resource Management, 55(4), 697-719. doi: 10.1002/hrm.21740
Reprinted with permission. All rights reserved.

Suggested Citation
Park, S., & Sturman, M. C. (2009). The relative effects of merit pay, bonuses, and long-term incentives on future job performance (CRI 2009-009). Retrieved [insert date] from Cornell University, ILR School, Compensation Research Initiative site: http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/cri/7

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