2009 Disability Status Report: New York

Table of Contents

The 2009 Annual Disability Status Report

The Annual Disability Status Reports provide policy makers, disability advocates, reporters, and the public with a summary of the most recent demographic and economic statistics on the non-institutionalized population with disabilities. They contain information on the population size and disability prevalence for various demographic subpopulations, as well as statistics related to employment, earnings, household income, veterans' service-connected disability and health insurance. Comparisons are made to people without disabilities and across disability types. Disability Status Reports and other statistics are available for the United States overall, each state, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico at www.disabilitystatistics.org.

The Status Reports primarily look at the working-age population because the employment gap between people with and without disabilities is a major focus of government programs and advocacy efforts. Employment is also a key factor in the social integration and economic self-sufficiency of working-age people with disabilities.

The estimates in the 2009 Disability Status Reports are based on American Community Survey (ACS) data — a US Census Bureau survey that has replaced the Decennial Census long form. See the ACS User Guide on www.disabilitystatistics.org for additional information on the ACS.

The estimates in these reports are based on responses from a sample of the population and may differ from actual population values because of sampling variability and other factors. Differences observed between the estimates for two or more groups may not be statistically significant.

Finally, the 2009 Disability Status Report estimates should not be compared to estimates from any reports based on ACS data collected prior to 2008. In 2008, the US Census Bureau made a number of significant changes to the ACS. These changes included an entirely new set of disability questions as described on the following page. For a summary of all changes to the ACS 2008 survey see the following Census Bureau document:

http://www.census.gov/acs/www/Downloads/methodology/content_test/SummaryResultsACS2006ContentTest.pdf

 

Suggested Citation

Erickson, W. Lee, C., & von Schrader, S. (2011). 2009 Disability Status Report: New York. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Employment and Disability Institute (EDI).

We would like to thank Sara VanLooy, Jeff Trondsen, and Joe Williams for their assistance with editing and production of this document.

ACS Disability Questions

The disability questions used in the ACS are listed below. Note that the Census Bureau refers to each of the individual types as "difficulty" while in this report the term "disability" is used.

  • Hearing Disability (asked of all ages):
    • Is this person deaf or does he/she have serious difficulty hearing?
  • Visual Disability (asked of all ages):
    • Is this person blind or does he/she have serious difficulty seeing even when wearing glasses?
  • Cognitive Disability (asked of persons ages 5 or older):
    • Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition, does this person have serious difficulty concentrating, remembering, or making decisions?
  • Ambulatory Disability (asked of persons ages 5 or older):
    • Does this person have serious difficulty walking or climbing stairs?
  • Self-Care Disability (asked of persons ages 5 or older):
    • Does this person have difficulty dressing or bathing?
  • Independent Living Disability (asked of persons ages 15 or older):
    • Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition, does this person have difficulty doing errands alone such as visiting a doctor’s office or shopping?

 

New Features and Notes

New Features

We are pleased to announce Spanish language versions of the Annual Disability Status Reports for the US, all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and Washington D.C. These reports can be downloaded at the same location as the English Status Reports. The Spanish translation was made possible funding from the Northeast Disability Technical Assistance Center (DBTAC) and NIDRR.

Notes

Puerto Rico: A Puerto Rico Disability Status Report, based on the parallel 2009 Puerto Rico Community Survey (PRCS), is available again this year in English as well as Spanish. However, please note that the Puerto Rico sample is not included in any U.S. population estimates included in these reports.

Group Quarters: In 2006, the ACS began surveying the group quarters population. We include the non-institutionalized group quarters population, but due to small state level sample sizes exclude the institutionalized group quarters population (see glossary) in the Disability Status Reports.

Margin of Error (MOE): As in previous years' reports we provide the 90% MOE to better illustrate sampling variability. See the glossary entry for more information on this topic.

Glossary: As in previous years, we provide a comprehensive glossary at the back of this report defining the terms used in the Disability Status Report (see glossary).

Note: According to the Census Bureau, estimates based on the ACS Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS) file such as those included in this report may differ slightly from the ACS summary tables produced by the Census Bureau, because they are subject to additional sampling error and further data processing operations. Please see http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/edi/disabilitystatistics/faq.cfm#Q4 for further information.

New York Summary

These statistics indicate the social and economic status of non-institutionalized people with disabilities in New York, using data from the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS).

Age: In 2009, the prevalence of disability in NY was:

  • 11.1 percent for persons of all ages
  • 0.9 percent for persons ages 4 and under
  • 4.7 percent for persons ages 5 to 15
  • 4.8 percent for persons ages 16 to 20
  • 9.1 percent for persons ages 21 to 64
  • 23.7 percent for persons ages 65 to 74
  • 48.9 percent for persons ages 75+

Disability Type: In 2009, the prevalence of the six disability types among persons of all ages in NY was:

  • 1.9% reported a Visual Disability
  • 2.8% reported a Hearing Disability
  • 6.6% reported an Ambulatory Disability
  • 4.3% reported a Cognitive Disability
  • 2.5% reported a Self-Care Disability
  • 5.2% reported an Independent Living Disability

Gender: In 2009, 11.7 percent of females of all ages and 10.4 percent of males of all ages in NY reported a disability.

Hispanic/Latino: In 2009, the prevalence of disability among persons of all ages of Hispanic or Latino origin in NY was 10.7 percent.

Race: In NY in 2009, the prevalence of disability for working-age people (ages 21 to 64) was:

  • 8.7 percent among Whites
  • 11.8 percent among Black / African Americans
  • 4.3 percent among Asians
  • 18.8 percent among Native Americans
  • 11.2 percent among persons of some other race(s)

Employment: In 2009, the employment rate of working-age people (ages 21 to 64) with disabilities in NY was 33.9 percent.

Looking for Work: In NY in 2009, the percentage actively looking for work among people with disabilities who were not working was 9.1 percent.

Full-Time/Full-Year Employment: In NY in 2009, the percentage of working-age people with disabilities working full-time/full-year was 21.5 percent.

Annual Earnings: In 2009, the median annual earnings of working-age people with disabilities working full-time/full-year in NY was $40,000.

Annual Household Income: In NY in 2009, the median annual income of households with working-age people with disabilities was $38,800.

Poverty: In NY in 2009, the poverty rate of working-age people with disabilities was 27.9 percent.

Supplemental Security Income: In 2009, the percentage of working-age people with disabilities receiving SSI payments in NY was 23.3 percent.

Educational Attainment: In 2009, the percentage of working-age people with disabilities in NY:

  • with only a high school diploma or equivalent was 32.6 percent
  • with only some college or an associate degree was 25.7 percent
  • with a bachelor's degree or more was 15.8 percent.

Veterans Service-Connected Disability: In 2009, the percentage of working-age civilian veterans with a VA determined Service-Connected Disability was 14.2 percent in NY.

Health Insurance Coverage: In 2009 in NY, 90.0 percent of working-age people with disabilities had health insurance.

Prevalence: Ages 21 - 64

This summary lists percentages by state of non-institutionalized working-age (ages 21 to 64) people with disabilities using data from the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS). The US disability prevalence rate for this population was 10.4%

Location 2009 (%) Location 2009 (%)
Alabama 15.5 Montana 11.8
Alaska 12.0 Nebraska 9.2
Arizona 10.3 Nevada 9.0
Arkansas 17.0 New Hampshire 9.2
California 8.4 New Jersey 7.8
Colorado 8.2 New Mexico 12.3
Connecticut 8.6 New York 9.1
Delaware 11.2 North Carolina 11.7
District of Columbia 10.0 North Dakota 9.2
Florida 9.9 Ohio 12.0
Georgia 10.5 Oklahoma 15.2
Hawaii 7.7 Oregon 11.2
Idaho 11.2 Pennsylvania 11.0
Illinois 8.2 Puerto Rico 19.1
Indiana 11.3 Rhode Island 10.2
Iowa 9.4 South Carolina 12.2
Kansas 10.6 South Dakota 9.7
Kentucky 16.4 Tennessee 13.9
Louisiana 13.0 Texas 10.3
Maine 14.4 Utah 8.3
Maryland 8.4 Vermont 11.4
Massachusetts 9.2 Virginia 9.3
Michigan 11.9 Washington 10.7
Minnesota 8.4 West Virginia 18.4
Mississippi 15.1 Wisconsin 8.9
Missouri 12.6 Wyoming 11.1

Employment: Ages 21 - 64

This summary lists employment rates by state of non-institutionalized working-age (ages 21 to 64) people with disabilities using data from the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS). The employment rate in the US for this population was 36.0% for people with disabilities and 76.8% for people without disabilities.

Location People with Disabilities 2009 People without Disabilities 2009 Location People with Disabilities 2009 People without Disabilities 2009
Alabama 30.0 74.8 Montana 45.5 78.6
Alaska 50.2 77.7 Nebraska 45.8 84.7
Arizona 33.9 73.4 Nevada 40.9 75.4
Arkansas 34.6 76.8 New Hampshire 39.3 82.0
California 34.2 74.3 New Jersey 40.2 77.8
Colorado 46.7 78.7 New Mexico 37.0 74.7
Connecticut 41.7 79.8 New York 33.9 76.4
Delaware 35.8 80.1 North Carolina 34.9 76.2
District of Columbia 28.3 78.0 North Dakota 56.1 85.4
Florida 32.9 74.6 Ohio 34.0 76.5
Georgia 34.6 75.4 Oklahoma 40.2 78.5
Hawaii 41.1 80.3 Oregon 38.1 74.7
Idaho 38.5 75.7 Pennsylvania 36.3 78.1
Illinois 36.3 76.5 Puerto Rico 22.8 57.6
Indiana 36.0 77.0 Rhode Island 36.6 80.6
Iowa 47.0 84.0 South Carolina 30.1 74.7
Kansas 44.7 81.7 South Dakota 45.8 83.3
Kentucky 28.1 74.7 Tennessee 30.2 75.7
Louisiana 35.0 76.3 Texas 39.8 77.1
Maine 33.8 81.0 Utah 43.3 77.9
Maryland 44.0 81.0 Vermont 44.2 83.6
Massachusetts 34.8 79.8 Virginia 39.6 80.0
Michigan 30.4 71.7 Washington 39.1 76.7
Minnesota 44.3 82.0 West Virginia 28.0 74.2
Mississippi 28.7 74.9 Wisconsin 40.3 81.6
Missouri 35.6 78.5 Wyoming 50.3 82.5

Prevalence

All Ages

Introduction

This section addresses the prevalence of disability among non-institutionalized people of all ages in New York, using data from the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS). For definitions of terms, see Glossary.

Quick Statistics

  • In 2009, the overall percentage (prevalence rate) of people with a disability of all ages in NY was 11.1 percent.
  • In other words, in 2009, 2,135,800 of the 19,292,800 individuals of all ages in NY reported one or more disabilities.
  • In NY in 2009, among the six types of disabilities identified in the ACS, the highest prevalence rate was for "Ambulatory Disability," 6.6 percent. The lowest prevalence rate was for "Visual Disability," 1.9 percent.

Prevalence of disability among non-institutionalized people of all ages in New York in 2009*

Disability Type Percent MOE Number MOE Base Population Sample Size
Any Disability 11.1 0.16 2,135,800 31,610 19,292,800 185,864
Visual 1.9 3.29 364,200 13,700 19,292,800 185,864
Hearing 2.8 0.09 536,300 16,550 19,292,800 185,864
Ambulatory 6.6 0.13 1,194,200 24,260 18,075,500 175,692
Cognitive 4.3 0.11 776,900 19,790 18,075,500 175,692
Self-Care 2.5 0.08 456,700 15,300 18,075,500 175,692
Independent Living 5.2 0.13 818,700 20,290 15,665,600 152,630

* Note: Children under the age of five were only asked about Vision and Hearing disabilities. The Independent Living disability question was only asked of persons aged 16 years old and older.

Prevalence

Ages 4 years and under

Introduction

This section focuses on the prevalence of disability among non-institutionalized children ages 4 and under in New York, using data from the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS). Only the two sensory disability questions were asked of this population. For definitions of terms, see Glossary.

Quick Statistics

  • In 2009, the overall percentage (prevalence rate) of children with a visual and/or hearing disability ages 0 to 4 in NY was 0.9 percent.
  • In other words, in 2009, 10,400 of the 1,217,300 children ages 0 to 4 in NY reported one or more disabilities.
  • In NY in 2009, 0.5 reported a visual disability
  • In NY in 2009, 0.6 reported a hearing disability

Prevalence of disability among non-institutionalized people ages 4 and under in New York in 2009

Disability Type Percent MOE Number MOE Base Population Sample Size
Any Disability 0.9 3.29 10,400 2,340 1,217,300 10,172
Visual 0.5 3.29 6,400 1,840 1,217,300 10,172
Hearing 0.6 3.29 6,900 1,900 1,217,300 10,172

Prevalence

Ages 5 to 15 years

Introduction

This section focuses on the prevalence of disability among non-institutionalized children ages 5 to 15 in New York, using data from the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS)*. For definitions of terms, see Glossary.

Quick Statistics

  • In 2009, the overall percentage (prevalence rate) of children with a disability ages 5 to 15 in NY was 4.7 percent.
  • In other words, in 2009, 124,700 of the 2,667,600 individuals ages 5 to 15 in NY reported one or more disabilities.
  • In NY in 2009, among the five types of disabilities* identified in the ACS, the highest prevalence rate was for "Cognitive Disability," 3.5 percent. The lowest prevalence rate was for "Hearing Disability," 0.5 percent.

Prevalence of disability* among non-institutionalized people ages 5 to 15 in New York in 2009

Disability Type Percent MOE Number MOE Base Population Sample Size
Any Disability 4.7 0.30 124,700 8,070 2,667,600 25,666
Visual 0.6 3.29 14,800 2,780 2,667,600 25,666
Hearing 0.5 3.29 14,200 2,730 2,667,600 25,666
Ambulatory 0.8 3.29 21,100 3,330 2,667,600 25,666
Cognitive 3.5 0.26 92,600 6,960 2,667,600 25,666
Self-Care 0.9 3.29 24,000 3,550 2,667,600 25,666

* Note: The "Independent Living Disability" question was not asked of children ages 15 years and younger.

Prevalence

Ages 16 to 20 years

Introduction

This section focuses on the prevalence of disability among non-institutionalized people ages 16 to 20 in New York, using data from the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS). For definitions of terms, see Glossary.

Quick Statistics

  • In 2009, the overall percentage (prevalence rate) of people with a disability ages 16 to 20 in NY was 4.8 percent.
  • In other words, in 2009, 68,100 of the 1,407,100 individuals ages 16 to 20 in NY reported one or more disabilities.
  • In NY in 2009, among the six types of disabilities identified in the ACS, the highest prevalence rate was for "Cognitive Disability," 3.3 percent. The lowest prevalence rate was for "Visual Disability," 0.5 percent.

Prevalence of disability among non-institutionalized people ages 16 to 20 in New York in 2009

Disability Type Percent MOE Number MOE Base Population Sample Size
Any Disability 4.8 0.41 68,100 5,970 1,407,100 13,011
Visual 0.5 3.29 7,500 1,980 1,407,100 13,011
Hearing 0.6 3.29 8,000 2,050 1,407,100 13,011
Ambulatory 0.8 3.29 11,200 2,430 1,407,100 13,011
Cognitive 3.3 0.35 46,700 4,940 1,407,100 13,011
Self-Care 0.5 3.29 7,700 2,000 1,407,100 13,011
Independent Living 1.6 3.29 22,100 3,410 1,407,100 13,011

Prevalence

Ages 21 to 64 years

Introduction

This section focuses on the prevalence of disability among non-institutionalized working-age people (ages 21 to 64) in New York, using data from the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS). For definitions of terms, see Glossary.

Quick Statistics

  • In 2009, the overall percentage (prevalence rate) of working age people (ages 21 to 64) with a disability in NY was 9.1 percent.
  • In other words, in 2009, 1,042,400 of the 11,487,400 individuals ages 21 to 64 in NY reported one or more disabilities.
  • In NY in 2009, among the six types of disabilities identified in the ACS, the highest prevalence rate was for "Ambulatory Disability," 4.9 percent. The lowest prevalence rate was "Visual Disability," 1.4 percent.

Prevalence of disability among non-institutionalized people ages 21 to 64 in New York in 2009

Disability Type Percent MOE Number MOE Base Population Sample Size
Any Disability 9.1 0.19 1,042,400 22,760 11,487,400 107,488
Visual 1.4 3.29 161,700 9,180 11,487,400 107,488
Hearing 1.6 3.29 186,600 9,850 11,487,400 107,488
Ambulatory 4.9 0.15 561,900 16,930 11,487,400 107,488
Cognitive 3.5 0.12 401,100 14,360 11,487,400 107,488
Self-Care 1.7 3.29 189,600 9,930 11,487,400 107,488
Independent Living 3.2 0.12 368,900 13,780 11,487,400 107,488

Prevalence

Ages 65 to 74 years

Introduction

This section explores the prevalence of disability among non-institutionalized people ages 65 to 74 in New York, using data from the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS). For definitions of terms, see Glossary.

Quick Statistics

  • In 2009, the overall percentage (prevalence rate) of people with a disability ages 65 to 74 in NY was 23.7 percent.
  • In other words, in 2009, 318,100 of the 1,344,700 individuals ages 65 to 74 in NY reported one or more disabilities.
  • In NY in 2009, among the six types of disabilities identified in the ACS, the highest prevalence rate was for "Ambulatory Disability," 15.6 percent. The lowest prevalence rate was for "Visual Disability," 4.0 percent.

Prevalence of disability among non-institutionalized people ages 65 to 74 in New York in 2009

Disability Type Percent MOE Number MOE Base Population Sample Size
Any Disability 23.7 0.84 318,100 12,820 1,344,700 15,659
Visual 4.0 0.39 54,100 5,320 1,344,700 15,659
Hearing 6.4 0.48 85,400 6,680 1,344,700 15,659
Ambulatory 15.6 0.72 209,800 10,440 1,344,700 15,659
Cognitive 5.3 0.44 70,800 6,090 1,344,700 15,659
Self-Care 4.4 0.41 59,300 5,570 1,344,700 15,659
Independent Living 8.5 0.55 114,000 7,710 1,344,700 15,659

Prevalence

Ages 75 and Older

Introduction

This section focuses on the prevalence of disability among non-institutionalized people ages 75 and older in New York, using data from the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS). For definitions of terms, see Glossary.

Quick Statistics

  • In 2009, the overall percentage (prevalence rate) of people with a disability ages 75 and older in NY was 48.9 percent.
  • In other words, in 2009, 572,000 of the 1,168,700 individuals ages 75 and older in NY reported one or more disabilities.
  • In NY in 2009, among the six types of disabilities identified in the ACS, the highest prevalence rate was for "Ambulatory Disability," 33.4 percent. The lowest prevalence rate was for "Visual Disability," 10.2 percent.

Prevalence of disability among non-institutionalized people ages 75 and older in New York in 2009

Disability Type Percent MOE Number MOE Base Population Sample Size
Any Disability 48.9 1.06 572,000 17,070 1,168,700 13,868
Visual 10.2 0.64 119,700 7,900 1,168,700 13,868
Hearing 20.1 0.85 235,300 11,050 1,168,700 13,868
Ambulatory 33.4 1.00 390,100 14,170 1,168,700 13,868
Cognitive 14.2 0.74 165,700 9,290 1,168,700 13,868
Self-Care 15.1 0.76 176,100 9,570 1,168,700 13,868
Independent Living 26.4 0.93 308,500 12,630 1,168,700 13,868

Prevalence

Gender and Age

Introduction

This section examines the prevalence of disability among people by gender and age group in New York, using data from the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS)*. For definitions of terms, see Glossary.

Quick Statistics

  • In NY in 2009, the overall percentage (prevalence rate) of males with a disability of all ages was 10.4 percent.
  • In other words, in 2009, 972,600 of the 9,344,900 males of all ages in NY reported one or more disabilities.
  • In NY in 2009, the overall percentage (prevalence rate) of females with a disability of all ages was 11.7 percent.
  • In other words, in 2009, 1,163,200 of the 9,948,000 females of all ages in NY reported one or more disabilities.

Prevalence of disability among non-institutionalized people by gender and age group in New York in 2009

Gender & Age Percent MOE Number MOE Base Population Sample Size
Males
Males: All Ages 10.4 0.26 972,600 25,180 9,344,900 88,563
Males: Ages 4 and under 0.9 3.29 5,700 1,980 626,700 5,214
Males: Ages 5-15 5.8 0.52 78,800 7,340 1,365,100 13,074
Males: Ages 16-20 5.3 0.69 38,000 5,100 717,700 6,692
Males: Ages 21-64 9.1 0.32 507,800 18,420 5,590,600 50,978
Males: Ages 65-74 23.9 1.44 143,700 9,890 601,700 7,145
Males: Ages 75+ 44.8 1.96 198,600 11,610 442,900 5,460
Females
Females: All Ages 11.7 0.27 1,163,200 27,390 9,948,000 97,301
Females: Ages 4 and under 0.8 3.29 4,700 1,790 590,600 4,958
Females: Ages 5-15 3.5 0.42 45,900 5,610 1,302,500 12,592
Females: Ages 16-20 4.4 0.65 30,200 4,550 689,300 6,319
Females: Ages 21-64 9.1 0.31 534,600 18,880 5,896,800 56,510
Females: Ages 65-74 23.5 1.29 174,400 10,890 743,000 8,514
Females: Ages 75+ 51.5 1.54 373,400 15,850 725,800 8,408

* Note: Children ages 0-4 were only asked about visual and hearing disabilities, children ages 5-15 were not asked the "Independent Living Disability" question.

Prevalence

Hispanic/Latino Origin and Age

Introduction

This section examines the prevalence of disability among people by Hispanic/Latino origin and age group in New York, using data from the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS)*. For definitions of terms, see Glossary.

Quick Statistics

  • In NY in 2009, the overall percentage (prevalence rate) of disability among people of Hispanic/Latino origin of all ages was 10.7 percent.
  • In other words, in 2009, 346,000 of the 3,236,900 people of Hispanic/Latino origin of all ages in NY reported one or more disabilities.
  • In NY in 2009, the overall percentage (prevalence rate) of disability among people of non-Hispanic/Latino origin of all ages was 11.1 percent.
  • In other words, in 2009, 1,789,800 of the 16,056,000 people of non-Hispanic/Latino origin of all ages in NY reported one or more disabilities.

* Note: Children ages 0-4 were only asked about visual and hearing disabilities, children age 5-15 were not asked the "Independent Living Disability" question.

Prevalence of disability among non-institutionalized people by Hispanic / Latino origin and age group in New York in 2009

Hispanic/Latino Origin & Age Percent MOE Number MOE Base Population Sample Size
Hispanic
Hispanic - All Ages 10.7 0.39 346,000 13,360 3,236,900 23,545
Hispanic - Ages 4 and under 1.2 3.29 3,600 1,370 303,700 1,888
Hispanic - Ages 5-15 6.0 0.74 33,300 4,180 550,900 4,216
Hispanic - Ages 16-20 4.7 0.93 12,900 2,600 272,600 2,102
Hispanic - Ages 21-64 10.4 0.51 193,800 10,040 1,871,000 13,302
Hispanic - Ages 65-74 32.9 2.85 47,100 4,970 143,000 1,218
Hispanic - Ages 75+ 57.7 3.66 55,200 5,380 95,700 819
Non-Hispanic
Non-Hispanic - All Ages 11.1 0.18 1,789,800 29,220 16,056,000 162,319
Non-Hispanic - Ages 4 and under 0.7 3.29 6,800 1,890 913,600 8,284
Non-Hispanic - Ages 5-15 4.3 0.32 91,400 6,910 2,116,700 21,450
Non-Hispanic - Ages 16-20 4.9 0.46 55,200 5,380 1,134,500 10,909
Non-Hispanic - Ages 21-64 8.8 0.21 848,600 20,650 9,616,400 94,186
Non-Hispanic - Ages 65-74 22.6 0.87 271,100 11,850 1,201,700 14,441
Non-Hispanic - Ages 75+ 48.2 1.11 516,700 16,250 1,073,000 13,049

* Note: Children ages 0-4 were only asked about visual and hearing disabilities, children ages 5-15 were not asked the "Independent Living Disability" question.

Prevalence

Race

Introduction

This section presents the disability prevalence rate among non-institutionalized working-age people (ages 21 to 64) by race category in NY, using data from the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS). For definitions of terms, see Glossary.

Quick Statistics

In 2009, among working-age people in NY:

  • 8.7 percent of persons who were White reported a disability.
  • 11.8 percent of persons who were Black/African American reported a disability.
  • 18.8 percent of persons who were Native American reported a disability.
  • 4.3 percent of persons who were Asian reported a disability.
  • 11.2 percent of persons who were some other race(s) reported a disability.

Prevalence of disability among non-institutionalized working-age people (ages 21 to 64) by race in New York in 2009

Race Percent MOE Number MOE Base Population Sample Size
White 8.7 0.23 676,100 18,510 7,795,100 79,875
Black/African American 11.8 0.56 204,900 10,320 1,733,700 12,619
Native American or
Alaska Native
18.8 4.71 6,800 1,890 36,200 356
Asian 4.3 0.49 38,300 4,480 885,700 7,467
Some other race(s) 11.2 0.71 116,400 7,790 1,036,700 7,171

Employment

Introduction

This section examines the employment rates of non-institutionalized working-age people (ages 21 to 64) with disabilities in New York, using data from the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS). For definitions of terms, see Glossary.

Quick Statistics

  • In 2009, the employment rate of working-age people with disabilities in NY was 33.9 percent.
  • In 2009, the employment rate of working-age people without disabilities in NY was 76.4 percent.
  • The gap between the employment rates of working-age people with and without disabilities was 42.5 percentage points.
  • Among the six types of disabilities identified in the ACS, the highest employment rate was for people with a "Hearing Disability," 51.4 percent. The lowest employment rate was for people with a "Independent Living Disability," 16.7 percent.

Employment of non-institutionalized working-age people (ages 21 to 64) by disability status in New York in 2009

Disability Type Percent MOE Number MOE Base Pop. Sample Size
No Disability 76.4 0.30 7,975,300 49,560 10,445,000 97,334
Any Disability 33.9 1.06 353,200 13,490 1,042,400 10,154
Visual 37.1 2.75 60,000 5,600 161,700 1,495
Hearing 51.4 2.65 95,800 7,080 186,600 1,926
Ambulatory 26.9 1.35 150,900 8,870 561,900 5,400
Cognitive 22.0 1.50 88,100 6,790 401,100 3,831
Self-Care 16.9 1.97 32,000 4,100 189,600 1,845
Independent Living 16.7 1.41 61,400 5,670 368,900 3,639

Not Working but Actively Looking for Work

Introduction

This section focuses on the percentage of non-institutionalized working-age people (ages 21 to 64) with disabilities in New York who are not working but actively looking for work, using data from the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS). For definitions of terms, see Glossary.

Quick Statistics

  • In 2009 in NY, the percentage of working-age people with disabilities who were not working but actively looking for work was 9.1 percent.
  • In 2009 in NY, the percentage of working-age people without disabilities who were not working but actively looking for work was 27.9 percent.
  • The difference in the percentage not working but actively looking for work between working-age people with and without disabilities was 18.8 percentage points.
  • Among the six types of disabilities identified in the ACS, the highest percentage of not working but actively looking for work was for people with a "Hearing Disability," 13.9 percent. The lowest percentage was for people with a "Self-Care Disability," 2.8 percent.

Percentage who are not working but actively looking for work among non-institutionalized working-age people (ages 21 to 64) in New York in 2009

Disability Type Percent MOE Number MOE Base Pop. Sample Size
No Disability 27.9 0.61 690,000 17,360 2,469,700 22,535
Any Disability 9.1 0.74 63,000 5,330 689,200 6,624
Visual 8.2 1.83 8,400 1,950 101,700 924
Hearing 13.9 2.44 12,600 2,390 90,800 895
Ambulatory 6.6 0.82 27,100 3,500 411,000 3,971
Cognitive 8.1 1.04 25,500 3,390 313,000 2,959
Self-Care 2.8 0.88 4,400 1,410 157,600 1,534
Independent Living 4.0 0.75 12,200 2,350 307,400 3,024

Full-Time / Full-Year Employment

Introduction

This section presents the percentage of non-institutionalized working-age people (ages 21 to 64) with disabilities working full-time/full-year in New York, using data from the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS). For definitions of terms, see Glossary.

Quick Statistics

  • In 2009, the percentage of working-age people with disabilities working full-time/full-year in NY was 21.5 percent.
  • In 2009, the percentage of working-age people without disabilities working full-time/full-year in NY was 57.6 percent.
  • The difference in the percentage working full-time/full-year between working-age people with and without disabilities was 36.1 percentage points.
  • Among the six types of disabilities identified in the ACS, the highest full-time/full-year employment rate was for people with "Hearing Disability," 37.6 percent. The lowest full-time/full-year employment rate was for people with "Independent Living Disability," 8.6 percent.

Full-Time/Full-Year employment of non-institutionalized working-age people (ages 21 to 64) by disability status in New York in 2009

Disability Type Percent MOE Number MOE Base Pop. Sample Size
No Disability 57.6 0.33 6,018,500 43,420 10,445,000 97,334
Any Disability 21.5 0.86 223,900 10,010 1,042,400 10,154
Visual 25.2 2.30 40,800 4,290 161,700 1,495
Hearing 37.6 2.39 70,100 5,620 186,600 1,926
Ambulatory 16.5 1.05 92,700 6,460 561,900 5,400
Cognitive 10.6 1.03 42,500 4,380 401,100 3,831
Self-Care 10.5 1.50 19,900 3,000 189,600 1,845
Independent Living 8.6 0.98 31,600 3,780 368,900 3,639

Annual Earnings (Full-Time / Full-Year workers)

Introduction

This section examines the median annual earnings of non-institutionalized working-age people (ages 21 to 64) with disabilities who work full-time/full-year in New York, using data from the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS). For definitions of terms, see Glossary.

Quick Statistics

  • In 2009, the median earnings of working-age people with disabilities who worked full-time/full-year in NY was $40,000.
  • In 2009, the median earnings of working-age people without disabilities who worked full-time/full-year in NY was $46,000.
  • The difference in the median earnings between working-age people with and without disabilities who worked full-time/full-year was $6,000.
  • Among the six types of disabilities identified in the ACS, the highest annual earnings was for people with "Hearing Disability," $45,000. The lowest annual earnings was for people with "Cognitive Disability," $35,000.

Caution: Estimate based on small sample size (less than 40 individuals).

Median annual earnings of non-institutionalized working-age people (ages 21 to 64) who work full-time/full-year by disability status in New York in 2009

Disability Type Median Earnings MOE Base Pop. Sample Size
No Disability $46,000 $450 6,018,000 55,816
Any Disability $40,000 $1,880 224,000 2,250
Visual $36,000 $4,530 41,000 393
Hearing $45,000 $3,950 70,000 740
Ambulatory $36,500 $2,670 93,000 889
Cognitive $35,000 $3,540 42,000 425
Self-Care $40,000 $6,690 20,000 181
Independent Living $36,000 $5,140 32,000 311

Annual Household Income

Introduction

This section illustrates the median annual income of households that include any working-age people (ages 21 to 64) with disabilities in New York, using data from the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS). For definitions of terms, see Glossary.

Quick Statistics

  • In 2009, the median income of households that include any working-age people with disabilities in NY was $38,800.
  • In 2009, the median income of households that do not include any working-age people with disabilities in NY was $66,000.
  • The difference in the median income between households including and not including working-age people with disabilities was $27,200.
  • Among the six types of disabilities identified in the ACS, the highest median income was for households including persons with a "Hearing Disability," $52,400. The lowest median income was for households containing persons with a "Cognitive Disability" .

Note: Household income is not available for persons living in group quarters.

Median annual income of households including any working-age people (ages 21 to 64) by disability status in New York in 2009

Disability Type Median H.H. Income MOE Base Pop. Sample Size
No Disability $66,000 $830 5,146,000 50,289
Any Disability $38,800 1,610 822,000 8,572
Visual $36,000 3,940 136,000 1,354
Hearing $52,400 4,040 165,000 1,809
Ambulatory $33,700 1,890 477,000 4,852
Cognitive $30,000 2,250 300,000 3,128
Self-Care $33,500 3,550 153,000 1,591
Independent Living $33,000 2,470 292,000 3,097

Note: Household income is not available for persons living in group quarters.

Poverty

Introduction

This section examines the poverty rates of non-institutionalized working-age people (ages 21 to 64) with disabilities in New York, using data from the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS). For definitions of terms, see Glossary.

Quick Statistics

  • In 2009, the poverty rate of working-age people with disabilities in NY was 27.9 percent.
  • In 2009, the poverty rate of working-age people without disabilities in NY was 10.4 percent.
  • The difference in the poverty rate between working-age people with and without disabilities was 17.5 percentage points.
  • Among the six types of disabilities identified in the ACS, the highest poverty rate was for people with "Cognitive Disability," 36.0 percent. The lowest poverty rate was for people with "Hearing Disability," 18.9 percent.

Note: The Census Bureau does not calculate poverty status for those people living in military group quarters or college dormitories.

Poverty rates of non-institutionalized working-age people (ages 21 to 64) by disability status in New York in 2009

Disability Type Percent MOE Number MOE Base Pop. Sample Size
No Disability 10.4 0.29 1,081,000 31,430 10,390,900 96,880
Any Disability 27.9 1.37 290,200 16,630 1,040,800 10,140
Visual 30.2 3.55 48,800 6,860 161,700 1,495
Hearing 18.9 2.82 35,200 5,830 186,200 1,922
Ambulatory 30.0 1.90 168,800 12,720 561,800 5,399
Cognitive 36.0 2.36 144,100 11,760 400,200 3,822
Self-Care 31.3 3.31 59,400 7,560 189,400 1,844
Independent Living 32.9 2.41 121,500 10,800 368,700 3,637

Note: The Census Bureau does not calculate poverty status for those people living in military group quarters or college dormitories.

Supplemental Security Income (SSI)

Introduction

This section focuses on the percentage of non-institutionalized working-age people (ages 21 to 64) with disabilities who receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments in New York, using data from the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS). For definitions of terms, see Glossary. Please note that these results will differ from official Social Security Administration reports for several reasons. For additional information, please email DisabilityStatistics@cornell.edu.

Quick Statistics

  • In 2009, the percentage of working-age people with disabilities receiving Supplemental Security Income payments in NY was 23.3 percent.
  • In 2009, the number of working-age people with disabilities receiving Supplemental Security Income payments in NY was 242,900.
  • Among the six types of disabilities identified in the ACS, the highest percentage that received SSI was people with "Independent Living Disability," 34.5 percent. The lowest percentage that received SSI was people with "Hearing Disability," 13.9 percent.

Percentage of non-institutionalized working-age people (ages 21 to 64) with disabilities who receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments in New York in 2009

Disability Type Percent MOE Number MOE Base Pop. Sample Size
Any Disability 23.3 0.88 242,900 10,420 1,042,400 10,154
Visual 22.2 2.20 35,900 4,030 161,700 1,495
Hearing 13.9 1.70 25,900 3,420 186,600 1,926
Ambulatory 24.8 1.23 139,400 7,920 561,900 5,400
Cognitive 33.9 1.59 135,800 7,810 401,100 3,831
Self-Care 32.6 2.29 61,700 5,280 189,600 1,845
Independent Living 34.5 1.67 127,100 7,560 368,900 3,639

Education

High School Diploma/Equivalent

Introduction

This section explores the percentage of non-institutionalized working-age people (ages 21 to 64) with disabilities with only a high school diploma or equivalent in New York, using data from the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS). For definitions of terms, see Glossary.

Quick Statistics

  • In 2009, the percentage of working-age people with disabilities with only a high school diploma or equivalent in NY was 32.6 percent.
  • In 2009, the percentage of working-age people without disabilities with only a high school diploma or equivalent in NY was 24.3 percent.
  • The difference in the percentage with only a high school diploma or equivalent between working-age people with and without disabilities was 8.3 percentage points.
  • Among the six types of disabilities identified in the ACS, the highest percentage with only a high school diploma or equivalent was for people with "Independent Living Disability," 33.3 percent. The lowest percentage with only a high school diploma or equivalent was for people with "Visual Disability," 29.8 percent.

Percentage of non-institutionalized working-age people (ages 21 to 64) with only a high school diploma or equivalent by disability status in NY in 2009

Disability Type Percent MOE Number MOE Base Pop. Sample Size
No Disability 24.3 0.33 2,541,600 36,510 10,445,000 97,334
Any Disability 32.6 1.13 340,000 14,190 1,042,400 10,154
Visual 29.8 2.79 48,200 5,380 161,700 1,495
Hearing 31.6 2.64 59,000 5,960 186,600 1,926
Ambulatory 32.5 1.53 182,600 10,440 561,900 5,400
Cognitive 32.8 1.82 131,700 8,880 401,100 3,831
Self-Care 32.5 2.64 61,700 6,090 189,600 1,845
Independent Living 33.3 1.91 122,700 8,570 368,900 3,639

Education

Some College/Associate's Degree

Introduction

This section examines the percentage of non-institutionalized working-age people (ages 21 to 64) with disabilities with only some college or an Associate's degree in New York, using data from the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS). For definitions of terms, see Glossary.

Quick Statistics

  • In 2009, the percentage of working-age people with disabilities with only some college or an Associate's degree in NY was 25.7 percent.
  • In 2009, the percentage of working-age people without disabilities with only some college or an Associate's degree in NY was 28.2 percent.
  • The difference in the percentage with only some college or an Associate's degree between working-age people with and without disabilities was 2.5 percentage points.
  • Among the six types of disabilities identified in the ACS, the highest percentage with only some college or an Associate's degree was for people with "Hearing Disability," 26.5 percent. The lowest percentage with only some college or Associate's degree was for people with "Cognitive Disability," 22.2 percent.

Percentage of non-institutionalized working-age people (ages 21 to 64) with only some college or an Associate's degree by disability status in New York in 2009

Disability Type Percent MOE Number MOE Base Pop. Sample Size
No Disability 28.2 0.34 2,943,900 38,820 10,445,000 97,334
Any Disability 25.7 1.05 268,000 12,620 1,042,400 10,154
Visual 24.1 2.61 39,000 4,850 161,700 1,495
Hearing 26.5 2.51 49,400 5,450 186,600 1,926
Ambulatory 26.5 1.45 149,100 9,440 561,900 5,400
Cognitive 22.2 1.61 89,100 7,310 401,100 3,831
Self-Care 25.3 2.45 48,000 5,370 189,600 1,845
Independent Living 23.1 1.70 85,200 7,150 368,900 3,639

Education

Bachelor's Degree or More

Introduction

This section presents the percentage of non-institutionalized working-age people (ages 21 to 64) with disabilities with a Bachelor's degree or more in New York, using data from the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS). For definitions of terms, see Glossary.

Quick Statistics

  • In 2009, the percentage of working-age people with disabilities with a Bachelor's degree or more in NY was 15.8 percent.
  • In 2009, the percentage of working-age people without disabilities with a Bachelor's degree or more in NY was 36.4 percent.
  • The difference in the percentage with a Bachelor's degree or more between working-age people with and without disabilities was 20.6 percentage points.
  • Among the six types of disabilities identified in the ACS, the highest percentage with a Bachelor's degree or more was for people with "Hearing Disability," 20.5 percent. The lowest percentage with a Bachelor's degree or more was for people with "Cognitive Disability," 11.2 percent.

Percentage of non-institutionalized working-age people (ages 21 to 64) with a Bachelor's degree or more by disability status in New York in 2009

Disability Type Percent MOE Number MOE Base Pop. Sample Size
No Disability 36.4 0.37 3,800,600 42,960 10,445,000 97,334
Any Disability 15.8 0.88 164,600 9,920 1,042,400 10,154
Visual 16.5 2.27 26,800 4,010 161,700 1,495
Hearing 20.5 2.29 38,300 4,800 186,600 1,926
Ambulatory 13.9 1.13 78,200 6,850 561,900 5,400
Cognitive 11.2 1.22 44,800 5,190 401,100 3,831
Self-Care 11.9 1.83 22,600 3,690 189,600 1,845
Independent Living 12.4 1.33 45,700 5,240 368,900 3,639

Veterans Service-Connected Disability Rating

Introduction

This section presents the percentage of non-institutionalized working-age (ages 21 to 64) civilian veterans reporting a service-connected disability rating in New York. The 2008 American Community Survey (ACS) asks if the veteran has a service-connected disability, and if so, what their rating is (0-100%). A "service-connected" disability is one that has been determined by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) as being a result of disease or injury incurred or aggravated during military service. Note that a veteran can receive disability compensation for a wide range of conditions, and a veteran with a service-connected disability may not report having one of the six ACS functional or activity limitation disabilities. For definitions of terms, see Glossary.

Quick Statistics

  • In 2009, there were 513,700 working-age civilian veterans in NY, of whom 72,900 had a VA service-connected disability.
  • In 2009, the percentage of working-age civilian veterans in NY with a VA service-connected disability was 14.2 percent.
  • In 2009, 13,700 working-age civilian veterans in NY had the most severe service-connected disability rating (70 percent or above).
  • In 2009, 18.8 percent of the working-age civilian veterans in NY who had a service connected disability had a service-connected disability rating of 70 percent or above.

Disability rating of working-age civilian veterans (ages 21 to 64) with a service-connected disability in New York in 2009

Service–Connected Disability Percent MOE Number MOE Base Pop. Sample Size
Has a service-connected disability rating (0-100%) 14.2 1.04 72,900 5,730 513,700 5,697
Disability rating of veterans with a service connected-disability
0 percent 8.6 2.21 6,300 1,690 72,900 810
10 or 20 percent 36.9 3.80 26,900 3,490 72,900 810
30 or 40 percent 14.4 2.77 10,500 2,180 72,900 810
50 or 60 percent 10.0 2.36 7,300 1,820 72,900 810
70 percent or higher 18.8 3.08 13,700 2,490 72,900 810
Rating not reported 11.3 2.50 8,300 1,930 72,900 810

Health Insurance Coverage

Introduction

This section examines the health insurance coverage of non-institutionalized working-age people (ages 21 to 64) with disabilities in New York, using data from the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS). For definitions of terms, see Glossary.

Quick Statistics

  • In 2009, 90.0 percent of working-age people with disabilities in NY had some type of health insurance coverage.
  • In 2009, 83.5 percent of working-age people without disabilities in NY had some type of health insurance coverage.
  • The difference in the health insurance coverage rate between working-age people with and without disabilities was 6.5 percentage points.
  • Among the six types of disabilities identified in the ACS, the highest health insurance coverage rate was for people with "Self-Care Disability," 94.1 percent. The lowest health insurance coverage rate was for people with "Hearing Disability," 89.7 percent.

Health Insurance Coverage of non-institutionalized working-age people (ages 21 to 64) by disability status in New York in 2009

Disability Type Percent MOE Number MOE Base Pop. Sample Size
No Disability 83.5 0.34 8,723,700 64,740 10,445,000 97,334
Any Disability 90.0 0.87 938,100 27,840 1,042,400 10,154
Visual 89.9 2.21 145,400 11,190 161,700 1,495
Hearing 89.7 2.07 167,300 12,000 186,600 1,926
Ambulatory 92.1 1.06 517,400 20,910 561,900 5,400
Cognitive 90.7 1.35 363,600 17,600 401,100 3,831
Self-Care 94.1 1.59 178,500 12,390 189,600 1,845
Independent Living 93.5 1.20 345,000 17,150 368,900 3,639

Type of Health Insurance Coverage

Introduction

This section examines the type of health insurance coverage for non-institutionalized working-age people (ages 21 to 64) with disabilities in New York, using data from the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS). Note that people can report more than one type of insurance coverage. For definitions of terms, see Glossary.

Quick Statistics

  • In 2009, 37.8 percent of working-age people with disabilities in NY reported health insurance coverage through a current or former employer or union (theirs or another family member).
  • In 2009, 66.4 percent of working-age people without disabilities in NY reported health insurance coverage through a current or former employer or union (theirs or another family member).
  • In 2009, 9.9 percent of working-age people with disabilities in NY reported purchasing health insurance coverage directly from an insurance company (by themselves or another family member).
  • In 2009, 22.5 percent of working-age people with disabilities in NY reported Medicare coverage and 45.7 percent reported Medicaid coverage (or other government-assistance plan for those with low incomes or a disability).

Type of Health Insurance Coverage of non-institutionalized working-age people (ages 21 to 64) by disability status in New York in 2009

Disability Status/ Insurance Type Percent MOE Number MOE Base Pop. Sample Size
Any Disability
Uninsured 10.0 0.87 104,300 9,490 1,042,400 10,154
Employer/Union 37.8 1.40 394,400 18,320 1,042,400 10,154
Purchased 9.9 0.86 103,300 9,440 1,042,400 10,154
Medicare 22.5 1.20 234,600 14,190 1,042,400 10,154
Medicaid 45.7 1.44 476,500 20,090 1,042,400 10,154
Military/VA 4.0 0.57 42,100 6,040 1,042,400 10,154
Indian Health Service 0.2 3.29 2,400 1,430 1,042,400 10,154
No Disability
Uninsured 16.5 0.34 1,721,300 36,910 10,445,000 97,334
Employer/Union 66.4 0.43 6,934,000 62,310 10,445,000 97,334
Purchased 9.8 0.27 1,028,600 29,080 10,445,000 97,334
Medicare 1.4 3.29 150,200 11,370 10,445,000 97,334
Medicaid 11.2 0.29 1,168,200 30,880 10,445,000 97,334
Military/VA 1.5 3.29 159,600 11,720 10,445,000 97,334
Indian Health Service 0.1 3.29 10,500 3,020 10,445,000 97,334

Glossary

Actively Looking for Work

A person is defined as ACTIVELY looking for work if he or she reports looking for work during the last four weeks.

Ambulatory Disability

This disability type is based on the question (asked of persons ages 5 or older): Does this person have serious difficulty walking or climbing stairs?

Base Population (Base Pop.)

The estimated number of individuals upon which the calculation is based. (For percentages, this is the denominator).

Cognitive Disability

This disability type is based on the question (asked of persons ages 5 or older): Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition, does this person have serious difficulty concentrating, remembering, or making decisions?

Disability and Disability Types

The ACS definition of disability is based on six questions. A person is coded as having a disability if he or she or a proxy respondent answers affirmatively for one or more of these six categories.

  • Hearing Disability (asked of all ages): Is this person deaf or does he/she have serious difficulty hearing?
  • Visual Disability (asked of all ages): Is this person blind or does he/she have serious difficulty seeing even when wearing glasses?
  • Cognitive Disability (asked of persons ages 5 or older): Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition, does this person have serious difficulty concentrating, remembering, or making decisions?
  • Ambulatory Disability (asked of persons ages 5 or older): Does this person have serious difficulty walking or climbing stairs?
  • Self-care Disability (asked of persons ages 5 or older): Does this person have difficulty dressing or bathing?
  • Independent Living Disability (asked of persons ages 15 or older): Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition, does this person have difficulty doing errands alone such as visiting a doctor’s office or shopping?

Earnings

Earnings are defined as wages, salary, commissions, bonuses, or tips from all jobs including self-employment income (NET income after business expenses) from own nonfarm businesses or farm businesses, including proprietorships and partnerships.

Education

Our definition is based on the responses to the question: "What is the highest degree or level of school this person has completed? If currently enrolled, mark the previous grade or highest degree received." Our category "high school diploma/equivalent" includes those marking the ACS option "Regular high school diploma — GED or alternative credential." Our category "Some college/Associate's degree" includes those marking the ACS options: some college credit, but less than 1 year of college credit; one or more years of college credit but no degree, or "Associate's degree (for example: AA, AS)." Our category "a Bachelor's or more" includes those marking the ACS options: "Bachelor's degree (for example: BA, BS)"; "Master's degree (for example: MA, MS, MEng, MEd, MSW, MBA)"; "Professional degree (for example: MD, DDS, DVM, LLB, JD)"; or "Doctorate degree (for example: PhD, EdD)." Note in 2008 changes were made to some of the response categories and the layout of this question.

Employment

A person is considered employed if he or she is either

  1. “at work”: those who did any work at all during the reference week as a paid employee (worked in his or her own business or profession, worked on his or her own farm, or worked 15 or more hours as an unpaid worker on a family farm or business) or
  2. were “with a job but not at work,” : had a job but temporarily did not work at that job during the reference week due to illness, bad weather, industrial dispute, vacation or other personal reasons. The reference week is defined as the week preceding the date the questionnaire was completed.

Full-Time/Full-Year Employment

A person is considered employed full-time/full-year if he or she worked 35 hours or more per week (full-time) and 50 or more weeks per year (full-year). The reference period is defined as the year preceding the date the questionnaire was completed. Note: this does not signify whether a person is eligible for fringe benefits. The question and response categories regarding weeks worked per year was changed in 2008.

Group Quarters (GQ)

A GQ is a place where people live or stay that is normally owned or managed by an entity or organization providing housing and/or services for the residents. These services may include custodial or medical care as well as other types of assistance, and residency is commonly restricted to those receiving these services. People living in group quarters are usually not related to each other. Group quarters include such places as college residence halls, residential treatment centers, skilled nursing facilities, group homes, military barracks, correctional facilities, and workers' dormitories. See the definitions of institutional GQs and non-institutional GQs for more information. In addition, a description of the types of group quarters included in the 2008 ACS is located on the U.S. Census Bureau's Web site at www.census.gov/acs/www/Downloads/
2008_ACS_GQ_Definitions.pdf
.

Health Insurance Coverage

Is based on the following question: Is this person CURRENTLY covered by any of the following types of health insurance or health coverage plans? Mark "Yes" or "No" for EACH type of coverage in items a – h.

  1. Insurance through a current or former employer or union (of this person or another family member)
  2. Insurance purchased directly from an insurance company (by this person or another family member)
  3. Medicare, for people 65 and older, or people with certain disabilities
  4. Medicaid, Medical Assistance, or any kind of government-assistance plan for those with low incomes or a disability
  5. VA (including those who have ever used or enrolled for VA health care)
  6. TRICARE or other military health care
  7. Indian Health Service
  8. Any other type of health insurance or health coverage plan – Specify (Note: “Other type” were recoded into one of the categories a-g by the Census Bureau)

Hearing Disability

This disability type is based on the question (asked of all ages): Is this person deaf or does he/she have serious difficulty hearing?

Hispanic or Latino Origin

People of Hispanic or Latino origin are those who classify themselves in a specific Hispanic or Latino category in response to the question, "Is this person Spanish/Hispanic/Latino?" Specifically, those of Hispanic or Latino origin are those who are Cuban; Mexican, Mexican American, Chicano; Puerto Rican; or other Spanish/Hispanic/Latino. Origin may be the heritage, nationality group, lineage, or country of birth of the person or the person's parents or ancestors before their arrival in the United States. People who identify their origin as Spanish, Hispanic, or Latino may be of any race.

Household Income

Household Income is defined as the total income of a household including: wages, salary, commissions, bonuses, or tips from all jobs; self-employment income (NET income after business expenses) from own non-farm or farm businesses, including proprietorships and partnerships; interest, dividends, net rental income, royalty income, or income from real estates and trusts; Social Security or Railroad Retirement; Supplemental Security Income; any public assistance or welfare payments from the state or local welfare office; retirement, survivor or disability pensions; and any other regularly received income (e.g., Veterans' payments, unemployment compensation, child support or alimony). Median household income is calculated with the household as the unit of analysis, using household weights without adjusting for household size.

Independent Living Disability

This disability type is based on the question (asked of persons ages 15 or older): Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition, does this person have difficulty doing errands alone such as visiting a doctors office or shopping?

Institutional Group Quarters (GQs)

Includes facilities for people under formally authorized, supervised care or custody at the time of enumeration. Generally, restricted to the institution, under the care or supervision of trained staff, and classified as "patients" or "inmates." Includes: correctional, nursing, and in-patient hospice facilities, psychiatric hospitals, juvenile group homes and residential treatment centers.

Margin of Error (MOE)

Data, such as data from the American Community Survey, is based on a sample, and therefore statistics derived from this data are subject to sampling variability. The margin of error (MOE) is a measure of the degree of sampling variability. In a random sample, the degree of sampling variation is determined by the underlying variability of the phenomena being estimated (e.g., income) and the size of the sample (i.e., the number of survey participants used to calculate the statistic). The smaller the margin of error, the lower the sampling variability and the more "precise" the estimate. A margin of error is the difference between an estimate and its upper or lower confidence bounds. Confidence bounds are calculated by adding the MOE to the estimate (upper bound) and subtracting the MOE from the estimate (lower bound). All margins of error in this report are based on a 90 percent confidence level. This means that there is a 90% certainty that the actual value lies somewhere between the upper and lower confidence bounds.

Non-Institutional Group Quarters (GQs)

Includes facilities that are not classified as institutional group quarters; such as college/university housing, group homes intended for adults, residential treatment facilities for adults, workers' group living quarters and Job Corps centers and religious group quarters.

Not Working but Actively Looking for Work

A person is defined as not working but actively looking for work if he or she reports not being employed, but has been looking for work during the last four weeks.

Number

This term appears in the tables; it refers to estimated number of people in the category. (for percentages, this is the numerator).

Poverty

The poverty measure is computed based upon the standards defined in Directive 14 from the Office of Management and Budget. These standards use poverty thresholds created in 1982 and index these thresholds to 2008 dollars using poverty factors based upon the Consumer Price Index. They use the family as the income sharing unit and family income is the sum of total income from each family member living in the household. The poverty threshold depends upon the size of the family; the age of the householder; and the number of related children under the age of 18.

Race

Race categories are based on the question, "[w]hat is this person's race? Mark (X) one or more races to indicate what this person considers himself/herself to be." Responses include the following: White; Black or African-American; American Indian or Alaska Native (print name of enrolled or principal tribe); Asian Indian; Chinese; Filipino; Japanese; Korean; Vietnamese; Other Asian (Print Race); Native Hawaiian; Guamanian or Chamarro; Samoan; Other Pacific Islander (Print Race Below); Some other race (print race below). "Other race" also contains people who report more than one race.

Sample Size

The number of survey participants used to calculate the statistic.

Self-care Disability

This disability type is based on the question (asked of persons ages 5 or older): 17c. Does this person have difficulty dressing or bathing?

Supplemental Security Income (SSI)

A person is defined as receiving SSI payments if he or she reports receiving (SSI) income in the 12 months prior to the survey.

Note: The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) does not apply to Puerto Rico. SSI is a federal cash assistance program that provides monthly payments to low-income aged, blind, or disabled persons in the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and the Northern Mariana Islands.

Veteran Service-Connected Disability

A disease or injury determined to have occurred in or to have been aggravated by military service. A disability is evaluated according to the VA Schedule for Rating Disabilities in Title 38, CFR, and Part 4. Extent of disability is expressed as a percentage from 0% (for conditions that exist but are not disabling to a compensable degree) to 100%, in increments of 10%. This information was determined by the following two part question:

  1. Does this person have a VA service-connected disability rating?
    Yes (such as 0%, 10%, 20%, ... , 100%)
    No SKIP to question 28a
  2. What is this person’s service-connected disability rating?”
    Responses included: 0 percent; 10 or 20 percent; 30 or 40 percent; 50 or 60 percent; 70 percent or higher

Visual Disability

This disability type is based on the question:(asked of all ages): Is this person blind or does he/she have serious difficulty seeing even when wearing glasses?

About the Disability Status Reports

The Cornell University Disability Status Reports is produced and funded by the Employment and Disability Institute at the Cornell University ILR School. This effort originated as a product of the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Disability Demographics and Statistics (StatsRRTC) funded to the Employment and Disability Institute in the ILR School at Cornell University by the U.S. Department of Education, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (grant No. H133B031111).

The contents of this report do not necessarily represent the policy of the Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government (Edgar, 75.620 (b)).

 

Contact Us

Employment and Disability Institute
Cornell University
Ithaca, New York 14853
Phone: 607.255.7727
Email: disabilitystatistics@cornell.edu
Web: www.disabilitystatistics.org