2005 Disability Status Reports

United States

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Table of Contents:

About the Center
Introduction
New Features, Changes, Cautions
Summary
Comparisons
Prevalence across States
Employment across States
Prevalence
Employment
Full-Time / Full-Year Employment
Annual Labor Earnings
Annual Household Income
Poverty Rate
Supplemental Security Income
Housing
Activity Limitation - Employment
Age Distribution
Race Distribution
Gender Distribution
Education Distribution
Glossary
Contact Us

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About the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Disability Demographics and Statistics

The Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Disability Demographics and Statistics (StatsRRTC) bridges the divide between the sources of disability data and the users of disability statistics. We conduct research exploring the reliability of existing data sources and collection methods, and study the potential to improve current and future data collection efforts.

The StatsRRTC is an interdisciplinary effort of three organizations at Cornell University: the Employment and Disability Institute, the Department of Policy Analysis and Management, and the Institute for Policy Research in Washington, DC. In addition, expertise is drawn from the following collaborating institutions: American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD), Center for an Accessible Society, InfoUse, Institute for Matching Person and Technology, Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., and The Urban Institute.

Funded by the U.S. Department of Education, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research

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The Annual Disability Status Reports

The Annual Disability Status Reports provide policy makers, disability advocates, reporters, and the public with a summary of the most recent demographic and economic statistics on the working-age (ages 21-64) population with disabilities. They contain information on the population size, prevalence, employment, earnings, poverty, household income, housing, and activity limitations of working-age people with disabilities, as well as the composition of this population by age, race, gender, and educational attainment. Comparisons are made to working-age people without disabilities and across types of disabilities. Additional statistics by state are available at www.DisabilityStatistics.org.

The Status Reports look at the working-age population because the employment gap between people with and without disabilities is a major focus of government programming and advocacy efforts. Furthermore, employment is a key factor in the social integration and economic self-sufficiency of working-age people with disabilities. Future Status Reports will address the school- and retirement-age populations and eventually expand to education and health-related issues.

The estimates in the 2005 Disability Status Reports are based on American Community Survey (ACS) data—a U.S. Census Bureau survey designed to replace the decennial census long form. In future years, we hope to add information derived from other data sources, such as the Current Population Survey (CPS) and National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). See the ACS User Guide on our web site, www.DisabilityStatistics.org, for additional disability-related information in the ACS. A Census Bureau report, www.census.gov/prod/2005pubs/p60-226.pdf, provides a broader discussion of the ACS.

The estimates in these reports are based on responses from a sample of the population and may differ from actual values because of sampling variability or other factors. As a result, apparent differences between the estimates for two or more groups may not be statistically significant.

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New Features, Changes, Cautions

New Features

Tables: This year we have added several features to the Annual Disability Status Reports that will increase their usefulness. Each Status Report is now accompanied by a table that provides the statistics referenced in the text as well as additional information. This information includes the estimated population size that corresponds to each percentage (i.e., the numerator), thus eliminating the need to convert the percentage in a given category to numbers of people in that category. We also provide the estimated size of the population upon which the statistics are generated (i.e., the denominator of a percentage, or for medians, the population referenced). These tables also contain the sample sizes and standard errors associated with each estimate.

Glossary: Each Status Report continues to provide the definitions relevant to the statistics it contains. This year we have compiled all of these definitions, and the definitions associated with the new tables, into a single glossary.

Changes and Cautions

Single-Year Version: Last year, the Status Reports focused on whether a statistic increased or decreased from 2003 to 2004. This year, the Status Reports focus on only one year, 2005, and do not compare 2004 with 2005. The Status Reports are based on data from the American Community Survey (ACS), an annual Census Bureau survey. In 2005, the ACS moved out of its development phase and into full implementation. The sample design was changed to provide estimates for smaller locations (areas with populations of 65,000 individuals or more rather than areas with populations of 250,000 individuals or more). While both sample designs provide accurate national and state-level estimates, they are different, and these differences may have created a “seam” in the data between 2004 and 2005. As a result, we are not comparing 2004 with 2005. The Census Bureau itself is not producing multi-year profiles that compare years before and after this potential “seam.”

Caution: As a result of the possible “seam” referenced above, we suggest that you do not compare results of the 2004 Status Reports with the results of the 2005 Status Reports. Estimates may be derived from small samples; please refer to the tables on the back of each report for sample sizes and standard errors. Differences may not agree due to rounding.

Time-Trends Dropped: Last year, we provided Status Reports on time-trends in the prevalence of disability and the employment of people with disabilities from 2001-2004. Due to the potential “seam” referenced above, we are not providing trends this year.

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Summary

This is a summary of the statistics that appear in the 2005 Disability Status Reports. The statistics indicate the social and economic status of working-age people (ages 21-64) with disabilities, using data from the 2005 American Community Survey (ACS). State-level Status Reports and more information about the ACS are available at www.DisabilityStatistics.org. Regrettably, comparisons to the 2004 Disability Status Reports are not advisable due to changes in the ACS program.

Prevalence: In 2005, the percentage of working age individuals reporting a disability was 12.6 percent in the US.

Employment: In 2005, the employment rate of working age people with disabilities was 38.1 percent in the US.

Full-Time/Full-Year Employment: In 2005, the percentage of working age people with disabilities working full-time/ full-year was 22.6 percent in the US.

Annual Labor Earnings: In 2005, the median annual labor earnings of working age people with disabilities working full-time/full-year was $30,000 in the US.

Annual Household Income: In 2005, the median annual household income of working age people with disabilities was $35,000 in the US.

Poverty: In 2005, the poverty rate of working age people with disabilities was 24.6 percent in the US.

Supplemental Security Income: In 2005, the percentage of working-age people with disabilities receiving SSI payments was 15.4 percent in the US.

Housing: In 2005, the percentage of people with disabilities living in owner occupied housing was 62.5 percent in the US.

Activity Limitation—Employment: In 2005, the percentage of working-age people with sensory, physical and/or mental disabilities that report an employment disability (difficulty working at a job or business) was 53.8 percent in the US.

Age Distribution: In 2005, 10.9 percent of working age people with disabilities were ages 21-29 in the US.

Race Distribution: In 2005, 26.4 percent of working age people with disabilities were non-white in the US.

Gender Distribution: In 2005, 51.6 percent of working age people with disabilities were women in the US.

Education Distribution: In 2005, 12.8 percent of working age people with disabilities had a Bachelor’s degree or more in the US.

Prevalence Across States: In 2005, West Virginia had the highest prevalence of disability among its working-age population − 21.7 percent.

Employment Across States: In 2005, North Dakota had the highest employment rate of working-age people with disabilities − 55.2 percent.

Note: Go to the Glossary for definitions of terms. Differences may not agree due to rounding.Source: Calculations by the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Disability Demographics and Statistics (StatsRRTC) using the 2005 ACS Public Use Microdata Samples (PUMS).Contact: Ask questions via our technical assistance form at www.DisabilityStatistics.org.

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Comparisons

This is a summary of the comparative statistics that appear in the individual 2005 Disability Status Reports. The statistics indicate the relative social and economic status of working-age people (ages 21-64) with and without disabilities, using data from the 2005 American Community Survey (ACS). State-level Status Reports and more information about the ACS are available at www.DisabilityStatistics.org. Regrettably, comparisons to the 2004 Disability Status Reports are not advisable due to changes in the ACS program.

Employment: In 2005, the gap between the employment rates of working-age people with and without disabilities was 40.3 percentage points in the US.

Full-Time/Full-Year Employment: In 2005, the difference in the percentage working full-time/full-year between working age people with and without disabilities was 33.6 percentage points in the US.

Annual Labor Earnings: In 2005, the difference in the median labor earnings between working age people with and without disabilities who worked full-time/full-year was $6,000 in the US.

Annual Household Income: In 2005, the difference in the median household income between working age people with and without disabilities was $26,500 in the US.

Poverty: In 2005, the difference in the poverty rate between working age people with and without disabilities was 15.3 percentage points in the US.

Housing: In 2005, the difference in the percentage living in owner occupied housing between working age people with and without disabilities was 7.4 percentage points in the US.

Employment Across States: In 2005, the largest gap between the employment rates of working-age people with and without disabilities was in West Virginia − 48.9 percentage points.

Note: Go to the Glossary for definitions of terms. Differences may not agree due to rounding.Source: Calculations by the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Disability Demographics and Statistics (StatsRRTC) using the 2005 ACS Public Use Microdata Samples (PUMS).Contact: Ask questions via our technical assistance form at www.DisabilityStatistics.org.

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Prevalence Across States

This summary addresses patterns across states in the percentage of working-age (ages 21-64) people with disabilities, using data from the 2005 American Community Survey (ACS). State-level Status Reports and more information about the ACS are available at www.DisabilityStatistics.org. Regrettably, comparisons to the 2004 Disability Status Reports are not advisable due to changes in the ACS program.

Location 2005
United States 12.6
Alabama 18.1
Alaska 14.9
Arizona 12.1
Arkansas 19.1
California 10.8
Colorado 10.1
Connecticut 10.0
DC 10.9
Delaware 12.2
Florida 12.7
Georgia 12.9
Hawaii 9.7
Idaho 14.1
Illinois 10.2
Indiana 13.7
Iowa 11.5
Kansas 12.0
Kentucky 19.7
Louisiana 16.4
Maine 15.4
Maryland 10.4
Massachusetts 10.7
Michigan 13.3
Minnesota 9.8
Mississippi 18.9
Location 2005
Missouri 15.3
Montana 13.3
Nebraska 11.4
Nevada 9.9
New Hampshire 11.7
New Jersey 9.4
New Mexico 15.1
New York 11.4
North Carolina 14.5
North Dakota 11.1
Ohio 13.8
Oklahoma 17.3
Oregon 13.6
Pennsylvania 12.9
Rhode Island 12.6
South Carolina 15.7
South Dakota 11.9
Tennessee 17.1
Texas 12.3
Utah 10.6
Vermont 13.1
Virginia 11.3
Washington 13.9
West Virginia 21.7
Wisconsin 10.8
Wyoming 14.1

Source: Calculations by the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Disability Demographics and Statistics (StatsRRTC) using the 2005 ACS Public Use Microdata Samples (PUMS).

Definition of Disability: The 2005 ACS definition of disability is based on three questions: (1) Does this person have any of the following long lasting-conditions: (a) blindness, deafness, or a severe vision or hearing impairment? and (b) a condition that substantially limits one or more basic physical activities such as walking, climbing stairs, reaching, lifting, or carrying? (2) Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition lasting 6 months or more, does this person have any difficulty in doing any of the following activities: (a) learning, remembering, or concentrating? and (b) dressing, bathing, or getting around inside the home? (3) Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition lasting 6 months or more, does this person have any difficulty in doing any of the following activities: (a) going outside the home alone to shop or visit a doctor’s office? (b) working at a job or business?

Note: Go to the Glossary for more definitions of terms.

Contact: Ask questions via our technical assistance form at www.DisabilityStatistics.org.

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Employment Across States

This summary addresses patterns across states in the employment rate of working-age (ages 21-64) people with disabilities, using data from the 2005 American Community Survey (ACS). State-level Status Reports and more information about the ACS are available at www.DisabilityStatistics.org. Regrettably, comparisons to the 2004 Disability Status Reports are not advisable due to changes in the ACS program.

People with Disabilities People without Disabilities
Location 2005 2005
United States 38.1 78.3
Alabama 32.8 77.3
Alaska 47.9 78.0
Arizona 38.8 77.0
Arkansas 34.3 79.6
California 37.4 75.7
Colorado 45.7 80.8
Connecticut 42.4 80.6
DC 36.4 76.3
Delaware 43.5 79.9
Florida 37.1 77.8
Georgia 36.3 78.2
Hawaii 43.3 79.3
Idaho 44.2 78.7
Illinois 39.5 77.6
Indiana 40.0 79.0
Iowa 44.3 84.3
Kansas 45.1 82.8
Kentucky 28.8 77.3
Louisiana 32.5 75.5
Maine 38.0 83.0
Maryland 42.8 81.7
Massachusetts 37.5 80.5
Michigan 36.0 76.9
Minnesota 44.9 83.5
Mississippi 31.4 77.1
People with Disabilities People without Disabilities
Location 2005 2005
Missouri 39.0 80.5
Montana 49.8 80.5
Nebraska 45.2 84.0
Nevada 40.8 78.1
New Hampshire 41.0 84.2
New Jersey 40.0 78.6
New Mexico 38.1 76.8
New York 35.7 76.6
North Carolina 37.1 79.2
North Dakota 55.2 86.1
Ohio 37.4 78.9
Oklahoma 38.8 78.3
Oregon 41.7 78.4
Pennsylvania 36.1 78.9
Rhode Island 38.6 82.5
South Carolina 32.5 78.1
South Dakota 53.3 84.7
Tennessee 32.5 78.5
Texas 40.3 76.7
Utah 52.9 79.2
Vermont 43.9 84.2
Virginia 40.7 80.5
Washington 43.1 78.3
West Virginia 25.5 74.4
Wisconsin 44.2 81.9
Wyoming 51.5 83.1

Source:Calculations by the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Disability Demographics and Statistics (StatsRRTC) using the 2005 ACS Public Use Microdata Samples (PUMS).

Definition of Employment: A person is considered employed if he or she (a) worked as a paid employee, worked in his or her own business or profession, worked on his or her own farm, or worked 15 or more hours as an unpaid worker on a family farm or business, or (b) had a job but temporarily did not work at that job during the reference period due to illness, bad weather, industrial dispute, vacation or other personal reasons. The reference period is defined as the week preceding the date the questionnaire was completed. Note: Go to the Glossary for more definitions of terms.

Contact: Ask questions via our technical assistance form at www.DisabilityStatistics.org.

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Prevalence

This Status Report addresses the prevalence of disability among working-age people (ages 21-64) in the United States, using data from the 2005 American Community Survey (ACS). State-level Status Reports and more information about the ACS are available at www.DisabilityStatistics.org. Regrettably, comparisons to the 2004 Disability Status Reports are not advisable due to changes in the ACS program.

Definition of Disability:The 2005 ACS definition is based on three questions: (1) Does this person have any of the following long-lasting conditions: (a) blindness, deafness, or a severe vision or hearing impairment? and (b) a condition that substantially limits one or more basic physical activities such as walking, climbing stairs, reaching, lifting, or carrying? (2) Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition lasting 6 months or more, does this person have any difficulty in doing any of the following activities: (a) learning, remembering, or concentrating? and (b) dressing, bathing, or getting around inside the home? (3) Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition lasting 6 months or more, does this person have any difficulty in doing any of the following activities: (a) going outside the home alone to shop or visit a doctor’s office? (b) working at a job or business?

Statistics Associated with the 2005 Status Report on Prevalence for the United States

Prevalence of disability among working-age people (ages 21-64)

Group Year Value (%) Standard Error (%) Value (Number) Standard Error (Number) Base Population Sample Size
Disability 2005 12.6 0.03 21,455,000 53,400 169,765,000 1,656,452
Sensory Disability 2005 3.0 0.02 5,074,000 26,800 169,765,000 1,656,452
Physical Disability 2005 7.8 0.02 13,313,000 42,700 169,765,000 1,656,452
Mental Disability 2005 4.4 0.02 7,526,000 32,500 169,765,000 1,656,452
Self-Care Disability 2005 2.2 0.01 3,712,000 23,000 169,765,000 1,656,452
Go-Outside-Home Disability 2005 3.1 0.02 5,336,000 27,400 169,765,000 1,656,452
Employment Disability 2005 7.3 0.02 12,386,000 41,300 169,765,000 1,656,452
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Employment

This Status Report addresses the employment rates of working-age people (ages 21-64) with disabilities in the United States, using data from the 2005 American Community Survey (ACS). State-level Status Reports and more information about the ACS are available at www.DisabilityStatistics.org. Regrettably, comparisons to the 2004 Disability Status Reports are not advisable due to changes in the ACS program.

Definition of Employment: A person is considered employed if he or she (a) worked as a paid employee, worked in his or her own business or profession, worked on his or her own farm, or worked 15 or more hours as an unpaid worker on a family farm or business, or (b) had a job but temporarily did not work at that job during the reference period due to illness, bad weather, industrial dispute, vacation or other personal reasons. The reference period is defined as the week preceding the date the questionnaire was completed.

Statistics Associated with the 2005 Status Report on Employment for the United States

Employment of working-age people (ages 21-64) by disability status

Group Year Value (%) Standard Error (%) Value (Number) Standard Error (Number) Base Population Sample Size
No Disability 2005 78.3 0.04 116,159,000 99,900 148,310,000 1,439,600
Disability 2005 38.1 0.13 8,167,000 33,800 21,455,000 216,852
Sensory Disability 2005 47.8 0.27 2,425,000 18,600 5,074,000 49,456
Physical Disability 2005 32.0 0.15 4,263,000 24,600 13,313,000 136,703
Mental Disability 2005 29.0 0.20 2,185,000 17,700 7,526,000 74,506
Self-Care Disability 2005 17.2 0.23 637,000 9,600 3,712,000 37,854
Go-Outside-Home Disability 2005 16.7 0.19 890,000 11,300 5,336,000 54,656
Employment Disability 2005 17.7 0.13 2,195,000 17,700 12,386,000 128,250
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Full-Time/Full-Year Employment

This Status Report addresses the percentage of working-age people (ages 21-64) with disabilities working full-time/full-year in the United States, using data from the 2005 American Community Survey (ACS). State-level Status Reports and more information about the ACS are available at www.DisabilityStatistics.org. Regrettably, comparisons to the 2004 Disability Status Reports are not advisable due to changes in the ACS program.

Definition of Full-Time/ Full-Year Employment: A person is considered employed full-time/full-year if he or she worked 35 hours or more per week (full-time) and 50 or more weeks per year (full-year). The reference period is defined as the year preceding the date the questionnaire was completed. Note: this does not signify whether a person is eligible for fringe benefits.

Statistics Associated with the 2005 Status Report on Full-Time / Full-Year Employment for the United States

Full-time/full-year employment ofworking-age people (ages 21-64) by disability status

Group Year Value (%) Standard Error (%) Value (Number) Standard Error (Number) Base Population Sample Size
No Disability 2005 56.2 0.06 83,340,000 107,700 148,310,000 1,439,600
Disability 2005 22.6 0.13 4,858,000 30,600 21,455,000 216,852
Sensory Disability 2005 31.7 0.29 1,608,000 17,700 5,074,000 49,456
Physical Disability 2005 18.8 0.15 2,499,000 22,000 13,313,000 136,703
Mental Disability 2005 14.2 0.18 1,071,000 14,500 7,526,000 74,506
Self-Care Disability 2005 9.0 0.21 334,000 8,100 3,712,000 37,854
Go-Outside-Home Disability 2005 7.8 0.16 417,000 9,000 5,336,000 54,656
Employment Disability 2005 7.9 0.11 973,000 13,800 12,386,000 128,250
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Annual Labor Earnings

This Status Report addresses the median annual labor earnings of working-age people (ages 21-64) with disabilities who work full-time/full-year in the United States, using data from the 2005 American Community Survey (ACS). State-level Status Reports and more information about the ACS are available at www.DisabilityStatistics.org. Regrettably, comparisons to the 2004 Disability Status Reports are not advisable due to changes in the ACS program.

Definition of Earnings: Earnings are defined as wages, salary, commissions, bonuses, or tips from all jobs; not including self-employment income from own non-farm businesses or farm businesses.

Definition of Full-time/full-year Employment: A person is considered employed full-time/full-year if he or she worked 35 hours or more per week (full-time) and 50 or more weeks per year (full-year). The reference period is defined as the year preceding the date the questionnaire was completed.

Statistics Associated with the 2005 Status Report on Annual Labor Earnings for the United States

Median annual labor earnings of working-age people (ages 21-64) who work full-time / full-year by disability status

Group Year Median Earnings Value Median Earnings St.Err. Number Sample Size
No Disability 2005 $36,000 $70 83,340,000 797,458
Disability 2005 $30,000 $120 4,858,000 47,922
Sensory Disability 2005 $32,000 $130 1,608,000 15,503
Physical Disability 2005 $30,000 $130 2,499,000 24,939
Mental Disability 2005 $26,000 $140 1,071,000 10,433
Self-Care Disability 2005 $30,000 $150 334,000 3,286
Go-Outside-Home Disability 2005 $29,300 $150 417,000 4,195
Employment Disability 2005 $28,000 $140 973,000 9,753
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Annual Household Income

This Status Report addresses the median annual household income of working-age people (ages 21-64) with disabilities in the United States, using data from the 2005 American Community Survey (ACS). State-level Status Reports and more information about the ACS are available at www.DisabilityStatistics.org. Regrettably, comparisons to the 2004 Disability Status Reports are not advisable due to changes in the ACS program.

Definition of Income: Income is defined as wages, salary, commissions, bonuses, or tips from all jobs; self-employment income from own non-farm businesses or farm businesses, including proprietorships and partnerships; interest, dividends, net rental income, royalty income, or income from real estates and trusts; Social Security or Railroad Retirement; Supplemental Security Income; any public assistance or welfare payments from the state or local welfare office; retirement, survivor or disability pensions; and any other regularly received income (e.g., Veterans’ payments, unemployment compensation, child support or alimony).

Statistics Associated with the 2005 Status Report on Annual Household Income for the United States

Median annual household income of working-age people (ages 21-64) by disability status

Group Year Median EarningsValue Median EarningsSt.Err. Number Sample Size
No Disability 2005 $61,500 N.E. 148,310,000 1,439,600
Disability 2005 $35,000 $280 21,455,000 216,852
Sensory Disability 2005 $37,200 $380 5,074,000 49,456
Physical Disability 2005 $33,000 $320 13,313,000 136,703
Mental Disability 2005 $28,500 $350 7,526,000 74,506
Self-Care Disability 2005 $28,800 $390 3,712,000 37,854
Go-Outside-Home Disability 2005 $28,900 $370 5,336,000 54,656
Employment Disability 2005 $29,100 $320 12,386,000 128,250
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Poverty Rate

This Status Report addresses the poverty rates of working-age people (ages 21-64) with disabilities in the United States, using data from the 2005 American Community Survey (ACS). State-level Status Reports and more information about the ACS are available at www.DisabilityStatistics.org. Regrettably, comparisons to the 2004 Disability Status Reports are not advisable due to changes in the ACS program.

Definition of Poverty: The poverty measure is computed based upon the standards defined in Directive 14 from the Office of Management and Budget. These standards use poverty thresholds created in 1982 and index these thresholds to 2004 dollars using poverty factors based upon the Consumer Price Index. They use the family as the income sharing unit and family income is the sum of total income from each family member living in the household. The poverty threshold depends upon the size of the family; the age of the householder; and the number of related children under the age of 18.

Statistics Associated with the 2005 Status Report on Poverty Rate for the United States

Poverty Rates of working-age people (ages 21-64) by disability status

Group Year Value (%) Standard Error (%) Value (Number) Standard Error (Number) Base Population Sample Size
No Disability 2005 9.3 0.04 13,854,000 61,700 148,310,000 1,439,600
Disability 2005 24.6 0.16 5,279,000 38,700 21,455,000 216,852
Sensory Disability 2005 22.2 0.31 1,125,000 18,000 5,074,000 49,456
Physical Disability 2005 25.7 0.20 3,418,000 31,200 13,313,000 136,703
Mental Disability 2005 31.2 0.29 2,345,000 25,900 7,526,000 74,506
Self-Care Disability 2005 29.9 0.40 1,111,000 17,900 3,712,000 37,854
Go-Outside-Home Disability 2005 30.7 0.34 1,639,000 21,700 5,336,000 54,656
Employment Disability 2005 30.0 0.22 3,721,000 32,600 12,386,000 128,250
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Supplemental Security Income

This Status Report addresses the percentage of working-age people (ages 21-64) with disabilities who receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments in the United States, using data from the 2005 American Community Survey (ACS). State-level Status Reports and more information about the ACS are available at www.DisabilityStatistics.org. Regrettably, comparisons to the 2004 Disability Status Reports are not advisable due to changes in the ACS program. Please note, these results will differ from official Social Security Administration reports for several reasons. For additional information, please email DisabilityStatistics@cornell.edu.

Definition of Receipt of SSI Payments: A person is defined as receiving SSI payments if he or she reports receiving SSI income in the 12 months prior to the survey.

Statistics Associated with the 2005 Status Report on Supplemental Security Income (SSI) for the United States

Percentage of working-age people (ages 21-64) with disabilities who receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments

Group Year Value (%) Standard Error (%) Value (Number) Standard Error (Number) Base Population Sample Size
Disability 2005 15.4 0.12 3,294,000 28,800 21,455,000 216,852
Sensory Disability 2005 13.4 0.24 681,000 13,200 5,074,000 49,456
Physical Disability 2005 16.4 0.16 2,184,000 23,500 13,313,000 136,703
Mental Disability 2005 23.5 0.25 1,765,000 21,200 7,526,000 74,506
Self-Care Disability 2005 24.3 0.36 904,000 15,200 3,712,000 37,854
Go-Outside-Home Disability 2005 26.8 0.31 1,428,000 19,100 5,336,000 54,656
Employment Disability 2005 22.6 0.19 2,795,000 26,600 12,386,000 128,250
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Housing

This Status Report addresses the percentage of working-age people (ages 21-64) with disabilities living in owner occupied housing in the United States, using data from the 2005 American Community Survey (ACS). State-level Status Reports and more information about the ACS are available at www.DisabilityStatistics.org. Regrettably, comparisons to the 2004 Disability Status Reports are not advisable due to changes in the ACS program.

Definition of living in owner occupied housing: This information is derived from the following question: Is this house, apartment, or mobile home: a) Owned by you or someone in this household with a mortgage or loan? b) Owned by you or someone in this household free and clear (without a mortgage or loan)? c) Rented for cash rent? d) Occupied without payment of cash rent? If a or b then own, if c or d then not owned.

Statistics Associated with the 2005 Status Report on Housing for the United States

Percentage of working-age people (ages 21-64) living in owner occupied housing by disability status

Group Year Value (%) Standard Error (%) Value (Number) Standard Error (Number) Base Population Sample Size
No Disability 2005 69.8 0.08 103,581,000 162,800 148,310,000 1,439,600
Disability 2005 62.5 0.21 13,402,000 71,400 21,455,000 216,852
Sensory Disability 2005 63.1 0.43 3,202,000 35,600 5,074,000 49,456
Physical Disability 2005 63.2 0.26 8,419,000 57,100 13,313,000 136,703
Mental Disability 2005 56.7 0.36 4,264,000 41,000 7,526,000 74,506
Self-Care Disability 2005 61.5 0.50 2,282,000 30,100 3,712,000 37,854
Go-Outside-Home Disability 2005 60.1 0.42 3,208,000 35,600 5,336,000 54,656
Employment Disability 2005 61.2 0.28 7,580,000 54,300 12,386,000 128,250
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Activity Limitation - Employment

This Status Report addresses employment disability (difficulty working at a job or business) among working-age people (ages 21-64) with sensory, physical and/or mental disabilities in the United States, using data from the 2005 American Community Survey (ACS). State-level Status Reports and more information about the ACS are available at www.DisabilityStatistics.org. Regrettably, comparisons to the 2004 Disability Status Reports are not advisable due to changes in the ACS program.

Definition of Employment Disability: The 2005 ACS employment disability definition is based on one of the six disability-related items: because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition lasting 6 months or more, does this person have any difficulty in doing any of the following activities: (b) working at a job or business?

Statistics Associated with the 2005 Status Report on Activity Limitation - Employment for the United States

Employment disability (difficulty working at a job or business) among working-age people (ages 21-64) with sensory, physical and/or mental disabilities

Group Year Value (%) Standard Error (%) Value (Number) Standard Error (Number) Base Population Sample Size
With sensory, physical and/or mental disabilities 2005 53.8 0.14 10,358,000 37,900 19,245,000 194,076
With Sensory Disability 2005 40.2 0.26 2,042,000 17,100 5,074,000 49,456
With Physical Disability 2005 63.5 0.16 8,451,000 34,300 13,313,000 136,703
With Mental Disability 2005 67.9 0.20 5,113,000 26,900 7,526,000 74,506
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Age Distribution

This Status Report addresses the age distribution among working-age people (ages 21-64) with disabilities in the United States, using data from the 2005 American Community Survey (ACS). State-level Status Reports and more information about the ACS are available at www.DisabilityStatistics.org. Regrettably, comparisons to the 2004 Disability Status Reports are not advisable due to changes in the ACS program.

In 2005, among people with disabilities in the US:

In comparison, in 2005, among people without disabilities in the US:

Definition of Age: The ACS question on age is as follows: “What is this person’s age and what is this person’s date of birth?”

Statistics Associated with the 2005 Status Report on Age Distribution for the United States

Age distribution among working-age people (ages 21-64) with disabilities

Group Age Year

PercentageValue

St.Err.Percentage

NumberValue

St.Err.Number

BasePopulation Sample Size
Disability ages 21-29 2005 10.9 0.08 2,334,000 18,200 21,455,000 216,852
Disability ages 30-39 2005 14.8 0.09 3,175,000 21,200 21,455,000 216,852
Disability ages 40-49 2005 25.9 0.11 5,561,000 28,000 21,455,000 216,852
Disability ages 50-59 2005 32.5 0.12 6,983,000 31,300 21,455,000 216,852
Disability ages 60-64 2005 15.9 0.09 3,402,000 22,000 21,455,000 216,852
No Disability ages 21-29 2005 21.9 0.04 32,483,000 64,400 148,310,000 1,439,600
No Disability ages 30-39 2005 24.9 0.04 36,975,000 68,100 148,310,000 1,439,600
No Disability ages 40-49 2005 26.5 0.04 39,310,000 69,900 148,310,000 1,439,600
No Disability ages 50-59 2005 20.2 0.04 29,932,000 62,100 148,310,000 1,439,600
No Disability ages 60-64 2005 6.5 0.02 9,610,000 36,500 148,310,000 1,439,600
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Race Distribution

This Status Report addresses the race distribution among working-age people (ages 21-64) with disabilities in the United States, using data from the 2005 American Community Survey (ACS). State-level Status Reports and more information about the ACS are available at www.DisabilityStatistics.org. Regrettably, comparisons to the 2004 Disability Status Reports are not advisable due to changes in the ACS program.

In 2005, among people with disabilities in the US:

In comparison, in 2005, among people without disabilities in the US, the percentage

Definition of Race: Our race categories are based on the question, “what is this person’s race? Mark (X) one or more races to indicate what this person considers himself/herself to be.” Responses include the following: White; Black or African-American; American Indian or Alaska Native (print name of enrolled or principal tribe); Asian Indian; Chinese; Filipino; Japanese; Korean; Vietnamese; Other Asian (Print Race); Native Hawaiian; Guamanian or Chamarro; Samoan; Other Pacific Islander (Print Race Below); Some other race (print race below). Other race also contains people who report more than one race.

Statistics Associated with the 2005 Status Report on Race Distribution for the United States

Race distribution among working-age people (ages 21-64) by disability status

Group Race Year

PercentageValue

St.Err.Percentage

NumberValue

St.Err.Number

Base
Population Sample Size
Disability White 2005 73.6 0.11 15,794,000 46,300 21,455,000 216,852
Disability Black/African American 2005 15.5 0.09 3,321,000 21,700 21,455,000 216,852
Disability Native American 2005 1.5 2.00 311,000 6,700 21,455,000 216,852
Disability Asian 2005 2.4 0.04 513,000 8,600 21,455,000 216,852
Disability Some other race 2005 7.1 0.07 1,515,000 14,700 21,455,000 216,852
No Disability White 2005 75.7 0.04 112,267,000 99,300 148,310,000 1,439,600
No Disability Black/African American 2005 11.1 0.03 16,397,000 47,200 148,310,000 1,439,600
No Disability Native American 2005 0.7 2.00 1,058,000 12,300 148,310,000 1,439,600
No Disability Asian 2005 5.1 0.02 7,595,000 32,600 148,310,000 1,439,600
No Disability Some other race 2005 7.4 0.03 10,993,000 39,000 148,310,000 1,439,600
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Gender Distribution

This Status Report addresses the gender distribution among working-age people (ages 21-64) with disabilities in the United States, using data from the 2005 American Community Survey (ACS). State-level Status Reports and more information about the ACS are available at www.DisabilityStatistics.org. Regrettably, comparisons to the 2004 Disability Status Reports are not advisable due to changes in the ACS program.

In 2005, among people with disabilities in the US:

In comparison, in 2005, among people without disabilities in the US:

Definition of Gender: Gender is based on the question: “What is this person’s sex? Responses include male and female.

Statistics Associated with the 2005 Status Report on Gender Distribution for the United States

Gender distribution among working-age people (ages 21-64) by disability status

Group Gender Year

PercentageValue

St.Err.Percentage

NumberValue

St.Err.Number

Base
Population Sample Size
Disability Women 2005 51.6 0.13 11,078,000 39,100 21,455,000 216,852
Disability Men 2005 48.4 0.13 10,377,000 37,900 21,455,000 216,852
No Disability Women 2005 50.7 0.05 75,184,000 89,400 148,310,000 1,439,600
No Disability Men 2005 49.3 0.05 73,125,000 88,600 148,310,000 1,439,600
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Education Distribution

This Status Report addresses the education distribution among working-age people (ages 21-64) with disabilities in the United States, using data from the 2005 American Community Survey (ACS). State-level Status Reports and more information about the ACS are available at www.DisabilityStatistics.org. Regrettably, comparisons to the 2004 Disability Status Reports are not advisable due to changes in the ACS program.

In 2005, among working-age people with disabilities in the US:

In comparison, in 2005, among working-age people without disabilities in the US:

Definition of Education: Our definition is based on the responses to the question: “What is the highest level of schooling this person has completed? If currently enrolled, mark the previous grade or highest degree received.” Our category, less than high school, includes those marking the ACS options: no schooling complete; nursery school to 4th grade; 5th grade or 6th grade; 7th grade or 8th grade; 9th grade; 10th grade; 11th grade; or “12th grade – NO DIPLOMA [emphasis is theirs].” Our category, high school diploma/equivalent, includes those marking the ACS option “HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATE – high school DIPLOMA or the equivalent (for example: GED).” Our category, some college, includes those marking the ACS options: some college credit, but less than 1 year; 1 or more years of college but no degree, or “Associate degree (for example: AA, AS).” Our category, a Bachelor’s or more, includes those marking the ACS options: “Bachelor’s degree (for example: BA, AB, BS)”; “Master’s degree (for example: MA, MS, MEng, Med, MSW, MBA)”; “Professional degree (for example: MD, DDS, DVM, LLB, JD)”; or “Doctorate degree (for example: PhD, EdD).”

Statistics Associated with the 2005 Status Report on Education Distribution for the United States

Education distribution among working-age people (ages 21-64) by disability status

Group Education Year

PercentageValue

St.Err.Percentage

NumberValue

St.Err.Number

Base
Population Sample Size
Disability Less than High school 2005 24.8 0.15 5,327,000 36,600 21,455,000 216,852
Disability High School or Equivalent 2005 34.5 0.16 7,392,000 42,900 21,455,000 216,852
Disability Some College 2005 28.0 0.15 5,999,000 38,700 21,455,000 216,852
Disability Bachelor Degree or more 2005 12.8 0.12 2,738,000 26,300 21,455,000 216,852
No Disability Less than High school 2005 11.5 0.04 17,117,000 64,200 148,310,000 1,439,600
No Disability High School or Equivalent 2005 27.9 0.06 41,381,000 95,200 148,310,000 1,439,600
No Disability Some College 2005 30.5 0.06 45,170,000 98,700 148,310,000 1,439,600
No Disability Bachelor Degree or more 2005 30.1 0.06 44,642,000 98,200 148,310,000 1,439,600
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Glossary

Age: The ACS question on age is as follows: “What is this person’s age and what is this person’s date of birth?”

Base Population: The estimated number of individuals upon which the calculation is based. (For percentages, this is the denominator.)

Disability and Disability Types: The ACS definition of disability is based on three questions. (1) Does this person have any of the following long-lasting conditions: (a) blindness, deafness, or a severe vision or hearing impairment? [Sensory Disability]; (b) a condition that substantially limits one or more basic physical activities such as walking, climbing stairs, reaching, lifting, or carrying? [Physical Disability] (2) Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition lasting 6 months or more, does this person have any difficulty in doing any of the following activities: (a) learning, remembering, or concentrating? [Mental Disability]; (b) dressing, bathing, or getting around inside the home? [Self-Care Disability] (3) Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition lasting 6 months or more, does this person have any difficulty in doing any of the following activities: (a) going outside the home alone to shop or visit a doctor’s office? [Go-Outside-Home Disability]; (b) working at a job or business? [Employment Disability] A person is coded as having a disability if he or she or a proxy respondent answers affirmatively for one or more of these six categories.

Earnings: Earnings are defined as wages, salary, commissions, bonuses, or tips from all jobs; not including self-employment income from own non-farm businesses or farm businesses.

Education: Our definition is based on the responses to the question: “What is the highest level of schooling this person has completed? If currently enrolled, mark the previous grade or highest degree received.” Our category, less than high school, includes those marking the ACS options: no schooling complete; nursery school to 4th grade; 5th grade or 6th grade; 7th grade or 8th grade; 9th grade; 10th grade; 11th grade; or “12th grade — NO DIPLOMA[emphasis is theirs].” Our category, high school diploma/equivalent, includes those marking the ACS option “HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATE — high school DIPLOMA or the equivalent (for example: GED).” Our category, some college, includes those marking the ACS options: some college credit, but less than 1 year; 1 or more years of college but no degree, or “Associate degree (for example: AA, AS).” Our category, a Bachelor’s or more, includes those marking the ACS options: “Bachelor’s degree (for example: BA, AB, BS)”; “Master’s degree (for example: MA, MS, MEng, Med, MSW, MBA)”; “Professional degree (for example: MD, DDS, DVM, LLB, JD)”; or “Doctorate degree (for example: PhD, EdD).”

Employment: A person is considered employed if he or she (a) worked as a paid employee, worked in his or her own business or profession, worked on his or her own farm, or worked 15 or more hours as an unpaid worker on a family farm or business, or (b) had a job but temporarily did not work at that job during the reference period due to illness, bad weather, industrial dispute, vacation or other personal reasons. The reference period is defined as the week preceding the date the questionnaire was completed.

Full-Time/Full-Year Employment: A person is considered employed full-time/full-year if he or she worked 35 hours or more per week (full-time) and 50 or more weeks per year (full-year). The reference period is defined as the year preceding the date the questionnaire was completed. Note: this does not signify whether a person is eligible for fringe benefits.

Gender: Gender is based on the question: “What is this person’s sex? Responses include male and female.

Income: Income is defined as wages, salary, commissions, bonuses, or tips from all jobs; self-employment income from own non-farm businesses, including proprietorships and partnerships; interest, dividends, net rental income, royalty income, or income from real estate or trusts; Social Security or Railroad Retirement; Supplemental Security Income; any public assistance or welfare payments from the state or local welfare office; retirement, survivor or disability pensions; and any other regularly received income (e.g., Veterans’ payments, unemployment compensation, child support or alimony).

Living in Owner Occupied Housing: This information is derived from the following question: Is this house, apartment, or mobile home: a) Owned by you or something in this household with a mortgage or loan? b) Owned by you or someone in this household free and clear (without a mortgage or loan)? c) Rented for cash rent? d) Occupied without payment of cash rent? If a or b then own, if c or d then not owned.

Number: This term appears in the tables; it refers to estimated number of people in the category. (For percentages, this is the numerator.)

Poverty: The poverty measure is computed based upon the standards defined in Directive 14 from the Office of Management and Budget. These standards use poverty thresholds created in 1982 and index these thresholds to 2004 dollars using poverty factors based upon the Consumer Price Index. They use the family as the income sharing unit and family income is the sum of total income from each family member living in the household. The poverty threshold depends upon the size of the family; the age of the householder; and the number of related children under the age of 18.

Race: Our race categories are based on the question, “[w]hat is this person’s race? Mark (X) one or more races to indicate what this person considers himself/herself to be.” Responses include the following: White; Black or African-American; American Indian or Alaska Native (print name of enrolled or principal tribe); Asian Indian; Chinese; Filipino; Japanese; Korean; Vietnamese; Other Asian (Print Race); Native Hawaiian; Guamanian or Chamarro; Samoan; Other Pacific Islander (Print Race Below); Some other race (print race below). Other race also contains people who report more than one race.

Receipt of SSI Payments: A person is defined as receiving SSI payments if he or she reports receiving SSI income in the 12 months prior to the survey.

Sample Size: The number of survey participants used to calculate the statistic.

Standard Error (SE): Data, such as data from the American Community Survey (ACS), is based on a sample and therefore statistics derived from this data are subject to sampling variability. The standard error (SE) represents the degree of sampling variability. In a random sample, the degree of sampling variation will be determined by the underlying variability of the phenomena being estimated (e.g., income) and the size of the sample (i.e., the number of survey participants used to calculate the statistic). The smaller the standard error—the lower the sampling variability—the more “precise” the estimate is considered.

Value: This term appears in the tables; it refers to estimated percentage, number, or median.

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Contact Us

For more information about the Annual Disability Status Reports contact:

This summary is being distributed by the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Disability Demographics and Statistics (StatsRRTC) at Cornell University.

The StatsRRTC is funded to Cornell University by the U.S. Department of Education, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (No. H133B031111). The contents of this paper do not necessarily represent the policy of the Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government (Edgar, 75.620 (b)).

Suggested Citation

StatsRRTC Co-Principal Investigators