2004 Disability Status Reports: United States Summary

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Table of Contents:

About the Center
Contact Information
Suggested Citation
Introduction
Summary
Comparisons

About the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Disability Demographics and Statistics

The Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Disability Demographics and Statistics (StatsRRTC) bridges the divide between the sources of disability data and the users of disability statistics. We conduct research exploring the reliability of existing data sources and collection methods, and study the potential to improve current and future data collection efforts.

The StatsRRTC is an interdisciplinary effort of three organizations at Cornell University: the Employment and Disability Institute, the Department of Policy Analysis and Management, and the Institute for Policy Research in Washington, DC. In addition, expertise is drawn from the following collaborating institutions: American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD), Center for an Accessible Society, InfoUse, Institute for Matching Person and Technology, Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., and The Urban Institute.

Funded by the U.S. Department of Education, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research

For more information about the Annual Disability Status Reports contact:
Andrew J. Houtenville, Director
Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on
Disability Demographics and Statistics (StatsRRTC)
Employment and Disability Institute
303 ILR Extension Building
Cornell University
Ithaca, New York 14853
Phone: 607.255.5702
Fax: 607.255.2763
Email: DisabilityStatistics@cornell.edu

This summary is being distributed by the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Disability Demographics and Statistics at Cornell University.

Suggested Citation: Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Disability Demographics and Statistics. (2005). 2004 Disability Status Reports. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University.

The StatsRRTC is funded to Cornell University by the U.S. Department of Education, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (No. H133B031111). The contents of this paper do not necessarily represent the policy of the Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government (Edgar, 75.620 (b)).

The Co-Principal Investigators are:

Susanne M. Bruyere: Director, Employment and Disability Institute, School of Industrial and Labor Relations, Extension Division, Cornell University

Richard V. Burkhauser: Sarah Gibson Blanding Professor, Department of Policy Analysis and Management, College of Human Ecology, Cornell University

Andrew J. Houtenville: Senior Research Associate, Employment and Disability Institute, School of Industrial and Labor Relations, Extension Division, Cornell University

David C. Stapleton: Director, Cornell University Institute for Policy Research

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The Annual Disability Status Reports: Introduction

The Annual Disability Status Reports provide policy makers, disability advocates, reporters, and the public with a summary of the most recent demographic and economic statistics on the working-age (ages 21-64) population with disabilities. They contain information on the population size, prevalence, employment, earnings, poverty, household income, home ownership, and activity limitations of working-age people with disabilities, as well as the composition of this population by age, race, gender, and educational attainment. Comparisons are made to working-age people without disabilities, across types of disabilities, and to the previous year. Additional statistics by state are available at www.DisabilityStatistics.org.

The Status Reports look at the working-age population (21-64) because the employment gap between people with and without disabilities is a major focus of government programming and advocacy efforts. Furthermore, employment is a key factor in the social integration and economic self-sufficiency of working-age people with disabilities. Future Status Reports will address the school- and retirement-age populations and eventually expand to education and health-related issues.

The estimates in the 2004 Status Reports are based on American Community Survey (ACS) data-a survey of the U.S. Census Bureau designed to replace the decennial census long form. In future years, we hope to add information derived from other data sources, such as the Current Population Survey (CPS) and National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). See ACS User Guide on our web site, www.DisabilityStatistics.org for additional disability-related information in the ACS. A Census Bureau report, www.census.gov/prod/2004pubs/p60-226.pdf, provides a broader discussion of the ACS.

The estimates in these reports are based on responses from a sample of the population and may differ from actual values because of sampling variability or other factors. As a result, apparent differences between the estimates for two or more groups may not be statistically significant. Asterisks (*) indicate whether increases and decreases are statistically significant at the 90-percent confidence level.

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Summary

This is a summary of the statistics that appear on the 2004 Disability Status Reports. The statistics indicate the social and economic status of working-age people (ages 21-64) with disabilities, using data from the 2003 and 2004 American Community Surveys (ACS). State-level Status Reports and more information about the ACS are available at www.DisabilityStatistics.org. Asterisks (*) indicate that increases and decreases are statistically significant at the 90-percent confidence level.

Prevalence: The percentage of working age individuals reporting a disability increased from 12 percent in 2003 to 12.1 percent in 2004, in the US.

Employment: The employment rate of working age people with disabilities decreased from 37.9 percent in 2003 to 37.5 percent in 2004, in the US.

Full-Time/Full-Year Employment: The percentage of working age people with disabilities working full-time/ full-year decreased* from 23 percent in 2003 to 22.4 percent in 2004, in the US.

Annual Labor Earnings: The median annual labor earnings of working age people with disabilities working full-time/full-year was unchanged from $30000 in 2003 to $30000 in 2004, in the US.

Household Annual Income: The median household annual income of working age people with disabilities increased from $34200 in 2003 to $34300 in 2004, in the US.

Poverty: The poverty rate of working age people with disabilities increased* from 23.3 percent in 2003 to 24.1 percent in 2004, in the US.

Supplemental Security Income: The percentage of working-age people with disabilities receiving SSI payments decreased from 15.4 percent in 2003 to 15.5 percent in 2004, in the US.

Housing: The percentage of people with disabilities living in owner occupied housing decreased from 63.7 percent in 2003 to 63.4 percent in 2004, in the US.

Activity Limitation-Employment: The percentage of working-age people with sensory, physical and/or mental disabilities that report an employment disability (difficulty working at a job or business) increased* from 53.2 percent in 2003 to 54.2 percent in 2004, in the US.

Age Distribution: Among people with disabilities, the percentage ages 21-29 increased* from 10.3 percent in 2003 to 10.6 percent in 2004, in the US.

Race Distribution: Among people with disabilities, the percentage non-white increased* from 25.4 percent in 2003 to 25.8 percent in 2004, in the US.

Gender Distribution: Among people with disabilities, the percentage that are women increased from 51.2 percent in 2003 to 51.6 percent in 2004, in the US.

Education Distribution: Among people with disabilities, the percentage with a Bachelor's degree or more increased from 12.5 percent in 2003 to 12.7 percent in 2004, in the US.

Prevalence Across States: Arkansas experienced the largest percentage point increase in the prevalence of disability among its working-age population - from 17.5 percent to 19.9 percent between 2003 and 2004.

Employment Across States: Vermont experienced the largest percentage point increase the employment rate of working-age people with disabilities - from 46.9 percent to 50.8 percent between 2003 and 2004.

Prevalence Trend: The percentage of working age people with sensory, physical, mental, and/or self-care disabilities increased* from 10.6 percent in 2001 to 10.9 percent in 2004, in the US.

Employment Trend: The employment rate of working-age people with sensory, physical, mental, and/or self-care disabilities decreased* from 40.8 percent in 2001 to 38.3 percent in 2004, in the US.

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Comparisons

This is a summary of the comparative statistics that appear on the individual 2004 Disability Status Reports. The statistics indicate the social and economic status of working-age people (ages 21-64) with disabilities, using data from the 2003 and 2004 American Community Surveys (ACS). State-level Status Reports and more information about the ACS are available at www.DisabilityStatistics.org. Asterisks (*) indicate that the terms "increased" and "decreased" reflect significant changes at the 90-percent confidence level.

Employment: The gap between the employment rates of working-age people with and without disabilities increased* from 39.7 percentage points in 2003 to 40.3 percentage points in 2004, in the US.

Full-Time/Full-Year Employment: The difference in the percentage working full-time/full-year between working age people with and without disabilities increased from 33.5 percentage points in 2003 to 33.8 percentage points in 2004, in the US.

Annual Labor Earnings: The difference in the median labor earnings between working age people with and without disabilities who worked full-time/full-year was unchanged from $5000 in 2003 to $5000 in 2004, in the US.

Annual Household Income: The difference in the median household income between working age people with and without disabilities increased* from $24200 in 2003 to $25700 in 2004, in the US.

Poverty: The difference in the poverty rate between working age people with and without disabilities increased* from 14.4 percentage points in 2003 to 15 percentage points in 2004, in the US.

Housing: The difference in the percentage living in owner occupied housing between working age people with and without disabilities increased from 5.7 percentage points in 2003 to 6.5 percentage points in 2004, in the US.

Employment Across States: The largest decline in the gap between the employment rates of working-age people with and without disabilities was in Rhode Island - from 45 percentage points in 2003 to 40.4 percentage points in 2004.

Employment Trend: The gap between the employment rates of working-age people with and without sensory, physical, mental, and/or self-care disabilities increased* from 37.3 percentage points in Year0 to 38.9 percentage points in 2004, in the US.

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For more information contact:

Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on
Disability Demographics and Statistics (StatsRRTC)
Cornell University
303 ILR Extension Building
Ithaca, New York 14853-3901

Tel: 607.255.9605
Fax: 607.255.2763
TTY: 607.255.2891
Email: DisabilityStatistics@cornell.edu
Web: www.DisabilityStatistics.org


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