Publication Date

10-2008

Abstract

[Excerpt] Does the tendency of groups to take credit for their success without acknowledging the input of specific group members affect subsequent group performance?

In a word, yes. This “group-serving bias” may cause groups to ignore or underestimate the potentially unique contributions made by each individual member, a common practice that can lead to inferior outcomes. When groups ascribe their success to individuals, they are more likely to explore a wide range of divergent alternatives before reaching consensus. Attribution to individuals also facilitates the sharing of information that is known to only one member of the group but is critical to making the right, or best, decision.

Comments

Suggested Citation
Goncalo, J. A. & Duguid, M. M. (2008). Group success depends on giving individuals credit where credit is due (Impact Brief #34). Ithaca, NY: ILR School, Cornell University. http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/briefs/51

For a more in-depth analysis, please see: Goncalo, J. A. & Duguid, M. M. (forthcoming). Group success depends on giving individuals credit where credit is due. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes.

The ILR Impact Brief series highlights the research and project based work conducted by ILR faculty that is relevant to workplace issues and public policy. The Briefs are prepared by Maralyn Edid, Senior Extension Associate, ILR School.

Required Publisher Statement
Copyright by Cornell University.



Share

COinS