Publication Date

2007

Abstract

In summer 2005, the trade union movement formalised its split into two rival confederations. The split was precipitated by the 2001 disaffiliation of the carpenters’ union, the Republican electoral victory of 2004, and the decline in union membership. Seven unions, accounting for forty per cent of the membership of the AFL-CIO formed Change to Win as a response to that federation’s ineffectiveness. This article concludes that the split may lead to new techniques for campaigning, but that it will not affect the fortunes or the social vision of the trade union movement.

Comments

Required Publisher Statement
© SAGE. Final version published as: Greer, I. (2006). Business union vs. business union? Understanding the split in the US labour movement. Capital & Class, 30(3), 1-6. doi: 10.1177/030981680609000102
Reprinted with permission. All rights reserved.

Suggested Citation
Greer, I. (2006). Business union vs. business union? Understanding the split in the US labour movement[Electronic version]. Retrieved [insert date], from Cornell University, ILR School site:
http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/articles/994

Share

COinS