Publication Date

2007

Abstract

Transnational politics and labor markets are undermining national industrial relations systems in Europe. This article examines the construction industry, where the internationalization of the labor market has gone especially far. To test hypotheses about differences between “national systems,” the authors examine the United Kingdom, Finland, and Germany, alongside European-level policy making. Regardless of overall national institutional framework, employers seek to avoid industrial relations rules, while unions attempt to relocalize labor relations. Both use shop-floor, national, and European power resources. The authors argue that comparative industrial relations should take seriously the connection between action at the national and transnational levels.

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Required Publisher Statement
© SAGE. Final version published as: Lillie, N., & Greer, I. (2007). Industrial relations, migration, and neoliberal politics: The case of the European construction sector. Politics & Society, 35(4), 551-581.
doi: 10.1177/0032329207308179
Reprinted with permission. All rights reserved.

Suggested Citation
Lillie, N., & Greer, I. (2007). Industrial relations, migration, and neoliberal politics: The case of the European construction sector[Electronic version]. Retrieved [insert date], from Cornell University, ILR School site:
http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/articles/984

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