Publication Date

Spring 1999

Abstract

[Excerpt] In the last several years a great deal of discussion has taken place both inside and outside the labor movement about the need for American unions to organize massive numbers of unorganized workers. Who exactly this target workforce should be, ranging from low-wage contingent workers in home care, janitorial, or food service occupations, to the legions of unorganized clerical workers in business services, to the expanding professional and technical workforce in our "high tech" economy; to both skilled and unskilled production workers in the light manufacturing plants which have sprouted up across the South and rural Midwest, remains a topic of debate. Agreement has also not been reached as to which strategies are most effective to organize which workers. Nor is there a clear understanding of what it takes to move beyond the initial certification election or recognition campaign to build lasting, vital unions in these newly organized workplaces— to organize for keeps.

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Suggested Citation

Bronfenbrenner, K. (1999). Organizing for keeps: Building a twenty-first century labor movement [Electronic version]. Retrieved [insert date], from Cornell University, ILR School site: http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/articles/560

Required Publisher Statement

© Sage Publications. Final version published as: Bronfenbrenner, K. (1999). Organizing for keeps: Building a twenty-first century labor movement. Labor Studies Journal, 24(1), 3-6. Reprinted with permission. All rights reserved.

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