Publication Date

9-1-2004

Abstract

Drawing on marketing and recruitment theory, we examined relationships between early recruitment practices, organizational factors, and organization-level recruitment outcomes, predicting that low-involvement recruitment practices, high-involvement recruitment practices, corporate advertising, and firm reputation would positively affect the quantity and quality of organizations’ applicant pools. We also predicted that corporate advertising and firm reputation would moderate the effects of the two recruitment strategies. Data for 99 organizations collected from multiple sources provided some evidence that early recruitment practices, corporate advertising, and firm reputation each had direct effects on applicant pool quantity and quality. More importantly, we found that low-involvement recruitment practices were more effective for firms with relatively low levels of corporate advertising and firm reputation, whereas high-involvement recruitment practices were more effective for firms with relatively high levels of advertising and reputation.

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Suggested Citation
Collins, C. J., & Han, J. (2004). Exploring applicant pool quantity and quality: The effects of early recruitment practice strategies, corporate advertising, and firm reputation. Retrieved [insert date] from Cornell University, School of Industrial and Labor Relations site:
http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/articles/44

Required Publisher Statement
Copyright by Blackwell Publishing. Final paper published as Collins, C. J., & Han, J. (2004). Exploring applicant pool quantity and quality: The effects of early recruitment practice strategies, corporate advertising, and firm reputation. Personnel Psychology, 57, 685-717.

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