Publication Date

2006

Abstract

The Heckhausen and Kuhl (1985) goal typology provided the conceptual foundation for this research, which examined the independent and integrated effects of achievement orientation and goal setting approaches on trainees’ self-regulatory activity. Using a complex computer-based simulation, the authors examined the effects of three training design factors cutting across these two theoretical domains – goal frame, goal content, and goal proximity – on the nature, focus, and quality of the self-regulatory activities of 524 trainees. Results revealed that all three factors had a significant influence on self-regulation, with goal content exhibiting the greatest influence. In line with expectations, congruent learning frame and content relative to congruent performance frame and content was beneficial for trainees’ self-regulatory activity, incongruent combinations of goal frame and content were better than congruent performance frames and content, and effects for the incongruent combinations cutting across the domains were asymmetrical. Theoretical extensions for further disentangling these distinct domains and training design implications are discussed.

Comments

Suggested Citation

Kozlowski, S. W. J. & Bell, B. S. (2006). Disentangling achievement orientation and goal setting: Effects on self-regulatory processes [Electronic version]. Retrieved [insert date], from Cornell University, ILR School site: http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/articles/414/

Required Publisher Statement

Copyright held by the American Psychological Association. Final version published as: Kozlowski, S. W. J. & Bell, B. S. (2006). Disentangling achievement orientation and goal setting: Effects on self-regulatory processes. Journal of Applied Psychology, 91(4), 900-916.

This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record. Journal of Applied Psychology is available online at: http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/apl/index.aspx.