Publication Date

7-2009

Abstract

Despite substantial growth in the service industry and emerging work on turnover consequences, little research examines how unit-level turnover rates affect essential customer-related outcomes. The authors propose an operational disruption framework to explain why voluntary turnover impairs customers’ service quality perceptions. Based on a sample of 75 work units and data from 5,631 employee surveys, 59,602 customer surveys, and organizational records, results indicate that unit-level voluntary turnover rates are negatively related to service quality perceptions. The authors also examine potential boundary conditions related to the disruption framework. Of three moderators studied (group cohesiveness, group size, and newcomer concentration), results show that turnover’s negative effects on service quality are more pronounced in larger units and in those with a greater concentration of newcomers.

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Suggested Citation
Hausknecht, J. P., Trevor, C. O. & Howard, M. J. (2009). Unit-level voluntary turnover rates and customer service quality: Implications of group cohesiveness, newcomer concentration, and size. Retrieved [insert date] from Cornell University, ILR school site:
http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/articles/325/

Required Publisher Statement
Copyright by American Psychological Association. This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record. Final version published as: Hausknecht, J. P., Trevor, C. O. & Howard, M. J. (2009). Unit-level voluntary turnover rates and customer service quality: Implications of group cohesiveness, newcomer concentration, and size. Journal of Applied Psychology, 94(4), 1068-1075.

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