Publication Date

9-2001

Abstract

Drawing on a non-random sample of 557 dual- earner white collar employees, this paper explores the relationship between human resource practices and three outcomes of interest to firms and employees: work-family conflict, employees’ control over managing work and family demands, and employees’ turnover intentions. We analyze three types of human resource practices: work-family policies, HR incentives designed to induce attachment to the firm, and the design of work. In a series of hierarchical regression equations, we find that work design characteristics explain the most variance in employees’ control over managing work and family demands, while HR incentives explain the most variance in work-family conflict and turnover intentions. We also find significant gender differences in each of the three models. Our results suggest that the most effective organizational responses to work-family conflict and to turnover are those that combine work-family policies with other human resource practices, including work redesign and commitment-enhancing incentives.

Comments

Suggested Citation
Batt, R. & Valcour, P. M. (2001). Human resource practices as predictors of work-family outcomes and employee turnover [Electronic version]. Retrieved [insert date] from Cornell University, ILR school site:
http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/articles/273/

Required Publisher Statement
Reprinted with permission of Wiley-Blackwell Publishing. Final version published as Batt, R. & Valcour, P. M. (2003). Human resource practices as predictors of work-family outcomes and employee turnover. Industrial Relations, 42(2), 189-220.