Publication Date

1979

Abstract

[Excerpt] People migrate and areas gain or lose population for a variety of reasons: differences in potential earnings, in job availability, in schooling opportunities, in quality of life, proximity to friends and relatives, and so on. The economic model of migration holds that the central factor determining individual migration decisions is the perceived opportunity to attain higher economic status. Area populations are expected to change differentially according to the economic opportunities offered. In empirical research in developed countries, economic factors have been shown to underlie most migration decisions. In developing countries, where the economic situation of the populace is far more precarious, we would expect economic forces to be even more powerful determinants of the spatial allocation of the population. To test this expectation, this paper applies the economic model of migration to one developing country, Colombia.

Comments

Required Publisher Statement
© Wiley. Final version published as: Fields, G. S. (1979). Lifetime migration in Colombia: Tests of the expected income hypothesis. Population and Development Review, 5(2), 247-265. doi: 10.2307/1971825
Reprinted with permission. All rights reserved.

Suggested Citation
Fields, G. S. (1979). Lifetime migration in Colombia: Tests of the expected income hypothesis [Electronic version]. Retrieved [insert date], from Cornell University, ILR School site: http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/articles/1163